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Since I' 1 




Research Park 

Ballots 

Reunion Schedule 

Bylaws 



Physical 11 
Marianne P 
Retires i 



erapy s 

McDonald 





Sea* Sle^bafer, KJclmj7r<3'Vrf>t3<t l ffS9 l Mcy htoxpl-tab. 



Miracles cosl money M( !\ Foundation provides n with over 22-+ endowment funds for 
research, education and patient care. Gifts come from corporations, private foundations 
and individuals. Like you. For more information, call David E. Bagby, Jr., at (80-+) 78b- c )?3-+. 

Made Possible In Part \\\ A Grant From The MCV Foundation. 






Since 1952 the magazine oftheMCV Alumni Association 

SCARAB 



Spring 1992 



Volume 41 Number 1 



2 A Born Teacher Retires 

An interview with Marianne E. McDonald 

4 A Shared Vision 

The Virginia Biotechnology Research Park 

6 MCV Foundation Has Another Banner-Making Year 

8 Articles of Incorporation 

9 Bylaws 

1 1 Dean's Corner 

Dr. Thomas C. Barker and Dr. S. Gaylen Bradley 

13 Board of Trustees Candidates 

16 Capsules 

19 Alumni Update 

21 Lest We Forget 



23 Reunion '92 Schedule and Registration 



26 Remininscences 



SCHEDULE 

23 

REMININSCENCES 

26 

COVER 

Marianne McDonald with students 

(from upper left) Chip Stoneman, Jim Griffith, 

Tony Smith, and Clint Owens. 

Photo by 

Jennifer Watson Holton 

Media Production Services, VCU 



Annual Meeting Notice 

At the MCV Alumni Association Annual Meeting on Saturday, May, 2, 1992, the Board of 
Trustees will ask Association members to consider adoption of the Bylaws and Amended 
Articles of Incorporation found on pages 8-10. The Board of Trustees believes these re- 
visions are necessary in order to meet the future needs of the Association. 



© 1992 Medical College of Virginia Alumni Asso- 
ciation of Virginia Commonwealth University, Box 
156, Richmond, VA 23298-0156 (804) 786-0434. 

The Scarab is the official publication of the Medi- 
cal College of Virginia Alumni Association of Vir- 
ginia Commonwealth University and is published 
three times a year, in the spring, summer, and fall. 



VCU PUBLICATIONS 91-92 



Executive Editor: Lou Brooks 
Editor: Joann Spider 
Designer: C. Benjamin Dacus 
Director, VCU Communications: 

Stephanie Halloran 

MCV Alumni Association of VCU Staff 

Elizabeth Littlefield 

Executive Director 
Ann M.Norman 

Assistant to the Executive Director 
Lynn Merrick 

Assistant to the Executive Director 
Anne Winder 

Special Assistant to the Executive Director 



SCARAB 



A 



BORN 

TEACHER 



RETIRES 



By Judith C. Warrington 



People can spend a lifetime searching for their role in 
life. Marianne E. McDonald, assistant professor of 
physical therapy, always knew her place was among 
her students. She was born to teach. 

When Ms. McDonald, "Mac" to her students, walks 
down the corridor of McGuire Hall, a textbook example of 
perfect posture, everyone speaks, not so much out of re- 
spect as out of genuine affection. 

After 28 years spent teaching in an anatomy lab, "Mac" 
will be retiring at the end of this semester. It is doubtful, 
however, that someone with her zest and enthusiasm could 
ever be called "retired." Slowing down is not part of her 
nature; she doesn't even drink decaffeinated coffee. 

In addition to teaching classes in functional anatomy, 
Ms. McDonald is assistant chairperson of the Department 
of Physical Therapy and serves as consultant to the Depart- 
ment of Mental Health and Mental Retardation in Peters- 
burg. 

But it's the students who come first-and always have-in 
her career. 

A native of Richmond, Ms. McDonald graduated from 
the University of North Carolina in 1954 and taught high 
school physical education for two years. The study of 
human movement and a love of teaching led her to study 
physical therapy at MCV. At that time, training in physical 
therapy offered a certificate. By the time she had com- 
pleted her studies in 1958, the program had acquired 
degree status. 

In 1964, after six years as clinical education supervisor 
at the Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Administration 
Medical Center, she joined the teaching staff of MCV. 
Looking back over her years on the MCV Campus, 
Ms. McDonald says, "I wouldn't take anything for that 
experience." 

As a student at MCV, she was privileged to study func- 
tional anatomy with Miss Suzanne Hirt. Miss Hirt was very 
much a hands-on teacher in the European tradition. "We 
had to learn to pantomime pathologic gaits," explains Ms. 
McDonald. "If you can feel something in your own body 
you can understand." 

It is this personal, hands-on approach to physical 
therapy with which she has guided her students over the 
years. It has also meant caring about their development as 
students and professionals. 

And she has a personal philosophy about education. 
She firmly believes that to succeed you must have a sense 
of humor and the ability to pick yourself up from flat on 
your face and keep going. Attrition among students comes 
not from a lack of academic achievement, she believes, but 
from the lack of will to go on and a lack of commitment. 



SCARAB 




Marianne McDonald, better known 
as "Mac," is shown above with a 
class. Summing up her years of 
teaching, she says, "My students 
taught me so much. Bless every 
one, whether they made it or not 
They contributed to me, and I 
had fun." 




"Do you know what it means to get a 
hug from a professor who is doing what 
you want to do? Not too many teachers 
will give a hug and say, 'I know you can 
do it.' I've hugged a lot of students.. .and 
it's been nice." 

Along the way she has received her 
share of hugs from appreciative students. 

When Ms. McDonald received the 
Baethke-Carlin Award for Teaching 
Excellence from the American Physical 
Therapy Association in 1983, she also 
received a scrapbook of letters written 
by former students. 

"It was so emotionally overwhelming," 
she says, still obviously affected by the 
memory of those letters. "It was the 
epitome of what I wanted to do with my 
life. I couldn't believe they were de- 
scribing me. I was having so much fun." 

As a personal tribute, the physical 
therapy class of 1989 awarded Ms. 



McDonald a plaque for excellence in 
education for her dedication to the per- 
sonal and professional achievements of 
all her students. And this year, as she 
retires, her contribution to the field and 
the quality of student life on the MCV 
Campus is being honored with an an- 
nual student scholarship award named 
in her behalf. 

Summing up her years of teaching, 
Ms. McDonald says, "My students taught 
me so much. Bless every one, whether 
they made it or not. They contributed to 
me, and I had fun. If a student says, 'I 
learned something, it was fun," that's 
the greatest compliment they could give 
me." 

Thank vou, "Mac." It has been 



Judith C. Warrington is a freelance writer 
in Richmond. 



SCARAB 



V 



<^ ED '//, 




# 



Virginia 



Biotechnology 



Research Park 



Not more than two blocks west of the bustling MCV Cam- 
pus lies a desolate urban space of flat-surface parking 
lots. By day it is spotted with potholes and cars, by night 
it sits an empty wasteland. It is a scene all too typical in the dwindling 
life of the city. ■ Today, however, people in Richmond are looking 
at this same area and seeing something different They see the future. 



A shared vision is bringing MCV/ 
VCU, the city of Richmond, the Com- 
monwealth of Virginia, and the local busi- 
ness community into a public/private 
venture to make Richmond a center for 
biomedical research and development. 

Over the next decade, a 15 square 
acre area, stretching from 11th to 3rd 
Street, from the Coliseum to 1-95, will 
become the Virginia Biotechnology 
Research Park, a corporate research park 
for the life sciences, adjacent to the MCV 
Campus of VCU. The research park is 
being developed as a nonprofit research 
development corporation and uses a city 
asset that already exists. Much of the 
land included in the proposed site is owned 
by the University, the city, or the state. 

The Virginia Biotechnology Research 
Park will include 750,000 to 1 million 
square feet of life science research activ- 
ity and is designed to appeal to private 
companies, institutes, and government 
agencies researching and developing tech- 
nologies for health care, safety, and the 



By Judith Warrington 



environment. And, it will foster collabo- 
ration between the University and indus- 
try. 

When completed, the research park 
will provide an innovative setting for a 
community of clinicians, scientists, and 
researchers. Intensive planning for the 
initial phase of laboratory and office space 
is in progress. Preconstruction leasing 
has already begun, with several compa- 
nies showing interest, even before the 
first ground has been turned for con- 
struction. 

According to University president Dr. 
Eugene P. Trani, who heads the research 
park's steering committee, a triumvirate 
of leadership from the University, gov- 
ernment, and private industry, this can 
only be called a "win/win situation" for 
everyone. 

"For the past 20 years, downtown 
Richmond has been looking for a new 



purpose," says Robert E. Olsen, project 
director and assistant to President Trani. 
As the former executive director of 
Richmond Renaissance, the city's pub- 
lic/private partnership for economic 
development, Mr. Olsen has been in- 
strumental in tackling some of the city's 
major development projects. He ap- 
proaches this new project with well- 
founded enthusiasm. 

When speaking of the potential of the 
Richmond project, Mr. Olsen gives an 
example of the dramatic growth of Mas- 
sachusetts Biotechnology Research Park 
in Worcester, the most successful bio- 
tech park in the United States. Since the 
Worcester research park began in 1987. 
20 biomedical companies have gone be- 
yond research and development to manu- 
facturing. Prior to 1980 there was no 
biotech industry in the area. Worcester 
is now the biotech center of Massachu- 
setts. The same could happen in 
Richmond for Virginia. 

All the factors are in its favor. 



SCARAB 



Richmond provides an ideal location for 
such a research center by filling in the 
gap in the eastern biotechnology corri- 
dor that stretches from Boston to Re- 
search Triangle in North Carolina. 

The location offers convenience for 
Richmond-based pharmaceutical compa- 
nies and is close to Washington, site of 
the Environmental Protection Agency, 
National Institutes of Health, and the 
Food and Drug Administration. In addi- 
ton, it has the advantage of being next 
door to the MCV Campus, the largest 
university-affiliated health sciences in- 
stitution in Virginia and the fourth larg- 
est in the U.S. 

The neighboring MCV Campus of- 
fers a wealth of resources, a research 
staff, access to Tompkins-McCaw Library, 
and accessible biomedi- 
cal research databases. 

MCV/VCU has al- 
ready formed successful 
ties with the biomedical/ 
biotechnical research in- 
dustry. It ranks among 
the top 75 universities 
in the amount of research 
funding it receives an- 
nually. In 1992 VCU is 
attracting $80 million in 
support for research ac- 
tivities from outside 
sources, 85 percent of 
which comes form the 
biomedical field. That 
percentage can only 
grow in the coming 
years, as biotechnology 
becomes the new indus- 
trial revolution of the 
1990s. 

In its role as an urban university, Dr. 
Trani sees VCU's involvement in the re- 
search park as another way in which it 
can have a major job impact on the growth 
and economic development of the com- 
munity. 

"I think it's a great opportunity for the 
University's academic health center and 
the community, a venture that would 
create jobs," says Dr. Trani. He esti- 
mates that the center could add 2,000 
people to Richmond's downtown 
workforce. 

Having long been interested in the 
concept of research parks, he empha- 
sizes that "biomedical centers situated 
adjacent to universities are the ones that 
make it." 



Mr. Olsen credits Dr. Trani for the 
speed with which the project has pro- 
gressed. "He has such enthusiasm for 
the project and is putting his energy 
behind it. He packed up the vision and 
folded it into his mission for the Univer- 
sity." Dr. Trani arrived at VCU at about 
the same time as Richmond Renaissance 
began considering the possibility of cre- 
ating a research center. The timing and 
the vision could not have been a more 
perfect match. 

"It is essential for the University to 
take the leading role," says Mr. Olsen, 
"University, government, and business, 
everyone is essential." Mr. Olsen states 
firmly that the project has full support of 
the University. Having visited over a 
dozen research parks in the U.S. and 



A 



shared vision is 
bringing MCV/VCU, 
the city of Richmond, the Commonwealth 
ot Virginia, and the local business com- 
munity into a public/ private venture to make Richmond 
a center for biomedical research and development. 



Europe, he says he knows what he wants 
to do and he is "overwhelmingly excited" 
about the possibilities. 

During the first phase of development, 
the research park's impact will be psy- 
chological, adding prestige to MCV/VCU 
and a new optimism about the city of 
Richmond. 

After five years, the center will begin 
having a definite impact on revenue and 
employment in Richmond. Its presence 
should help tin 1 University grow and 
increase its ability to cany out research. 

After ten years, the ripple effect of 
the research park should widen. Re- 
search and development companies 
should be at a stage where they plan 
manufacturing. The center will have 



statewide significance. 

Perhaps the MCV Campus will bene- 
fit most from its new neighbor right from 
the start. The establishement of the bio- 
technical research park will be an ap- 
pealing incentive to help bring research- 
ers to the campus. It should give the 
University more power to recruit top 
people by relieving one of its current 
problems, a lack of laboratory space. 

"We know the lab building will have a 
use. If not by industry, then the Univer- 
sity has a pressing need," says Mr. Olsen. 
He tells of some researchers using teach- 
ing lab space after hours to conduct their 
own research. Others must share space 
with three or four of their colleagues. 

He gives the following equation to ex- 
plain the value of having access to in- 
creased lab facilities. 
"For every $1 million in 
research, 10,000 square 
feet of laboratory space 
is needed. We are $10 
million ahead of the pre- 
vious year, but still in 
the same space." 

Now in a more inten- 
sive planning state, a plan 
of action for the research 
park is being ratified by 
the steering committee. 
While no official ground 
breaking date has been 
set, Mr. Olsen says, "My 
personal goal is to be 
under construction on 
the first part (a combi- 
nation of lab and office 
space) in 1993 and ready 
lor occupancy in 1994." 
Since the formal an- 
the project last Novcm- 
Kit no one has spoken 
against the development of the research 
park. From his experience as an urban 
planner, he says this is, 'The first proj- 
ect that hasn't involved ripping down a 
historic building or relocating houses 
and businesses." 

Mr. Olsen calls the research park "a 
natural." It offers something for every- 
one, the revitalizalion of downtown, an 
increase to Virginias economv idded 
lax revenue for the city, and unlimited 
promise for the University as il enters 
the twenty-first century. ■ 

Judith Warrington is a freelance writer in 
Richmond. 



nouncement of 

her, he savs t 



SCARAB 




MCV 

Foundation 

Has Another 

Banner-Making Year 

In spite of the recent slow ecomony, the Medical College of Virginia Foundation received 
gifts totalling $8,082,435 this last fiscal year, making it an exceptional year for gifts. As 
of the first quarter of this fiscal year, the foundation had already received $2,075,939, 
hinting that this year may be just as successful. ■ Private foundations continued 
their traditions of giving. The Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation, for example, has provided 




SCARAB 



funds to the MCV Campus for 11 years. 
A $45,000 payment on a $90,000 pledge 
to the School of Nursing for scholar- 
ships has already been made this year. 

Continuing its support of the Massey 
Cancer Center, the Massey Foundation 
made a contribution of $330,000. An- 
other long-term contributor, the Iind Law- 
rence Foundation, provided 
$145,000 to the Division of 
Neurosurgery. This gift will 
allow patients with neurologi- 
cal and brain injuries to re- 
ceive advanced medical treat- 
ments. 

The Department of Psychia- 
try was given a $30,000 dona- 
tion from the F. M. Kirby Foun- 
dation. This brings the Kirby 
Foundation's total contribution 
for teaching and research to 
$141,500 over the past seven 
years. 

Another $100,000 was given 
to the campus by the Richard 
S. Reynolds Foundation toward 
the Richard Roland Reynolds 
Neurological Research Labo- 
ratories to aid traumatic brain 
injury research. From here, 
the results are sent to help 
patients in the Neurosurgery/ 
Neurology Intensive Care Unit 
at MCV Hospitals. 

Also on the continuing giv- 
ers list was the Jessie Ball du- 
Pont Religious, Charitable, and Educa- 
tional Fund, which contributed $48,615 
to the Cancer Rural Home Healthcare 
Program of the Massey Cancer Center. 
This will go toward state-of-the-art can- 
cer care for people living in medically 
underserved areas of Virginia. 

Many companies also provided ongo- 
ing support to the MCV Campus. The 
Upjohn Comapny gave $45,000 for con- 



tinuing medical education and $24,900 
for substance abuse medicine. Another 
pharmaceutical company, Merck & 
Company, Inc., gave $29,600 to continu- 
ing medical education, while BioClin, 
Inc., a clinical research firm headquar- 
tered in Richmond, donated $29,167 for 
research in the Department of Pharmacy 



*Sifc^»*» 




Above 
The Jessie Ball duPont Religious, Charitable, 
and Educational Fund provided an additional 
$48,615 to the Cancer Rural Home Healthcare 
Program of the Massey Cancer Center. 

Left 
The Division of Neurosurgery received an- 
other contribution from the Lind Lawrence 
Foundation, while the Richard Roland Rey- 
nolds Neurological Research Laboratories 
received continued support from the Richard 
S. Reynolds Foundation. 



and Pharmaceutics. Plastic surgery re- 
search benefited as well, receiving a cor- 
porate donation of $53,284 from Ethicon, 
Inc. 

Other areas that benefited from cor- 
porate gifts were the Department of 
Radiation Safety and the Burn Unit at 
MCV Hospitals, which received $37,000 
from Virginia Power, while the Depart- 
ment of Genetics had a $100,000 pledge 



completed by the First Hospital Corpo- 
ration of Norfolk. 

Private contributions also remained 
strong. Twenty-five thousand dollars were 
given for medical students with financial 
need by the estate of William S. Dosher, 
M.D., M'30. These were placed in the 
Richard H. Kirkland Medical Scholar- 
ship Fund for use at the begin- 
ning of the 1991 school year. 

Another donation of $25,000 
from Mr. E. Claiborne Robins, 
P'33, went toward the E. 
Claiborne Robins Professorship 
in the School of Pharmacy to 
fund an eminent scholar/re- 
searcher. 

A significant contributor to 
the Department of Psychiatry 
was Mrs. Rachel Brown Banks, 
whose gift of $100,000 will be 
used for programmatic needs 
and to stimulate research about 
affective disorders, such as de- 
pression. The gift provides for 
$70,000 to go into the depart- 
ment's endowment fund, with 
the remaining $30,000 to be 
for current use. 

The number of contributions 
to the MCV Foundation and 
their amounts are an indica- 
tion of the quality of research 
work and the care given pa- 
tients. Quality makes the 
Health Sciences Division of 
VCU a benefactor of many foundations, 
corporations, and individuals year after 
year and distinguishes it from other aca- 
demic health care facilities. Most im- 
portantly, it is this work that makes giv- 
ing to the MCV Foundation so worth- 
while. ■ 



7 



SCARAB 

AMENDED AND RESTATED ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION 

of the 
MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF 
VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY 



Article I 

Purpose 

The name of the corporation shall be 
the Medical College of Virginia Alumni 
Association of Virginia Commonwealth 
University. 



Article II 

Purpose 

The corporation is organized and shall 
be operated exclusively for charitable, lit- 
erary, educational, and scientific purposes, 
including for such purposes the making of 
distributions to organizations that qualify 
as exempt organizations under Section 
501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 
1954 and amendments thereto. No sub- 
stantial part of the activites of the corpora- 
tion shall include social, recreational, and 
other activities not permitted to be carried 
on by a corporation exempt from Federal 
income tax under Section 501 (c) (3) of the 
Internal Revenue Code of 1954 and amend- 
ments thereto. The principal purpose shall 
be to foster a spirit of loyalty and fraternity 
among graduated and former students of 
the Medical College of Virginia and to 
bring about united and concerned action 
in promoting the welfare of the institution 
as it seeks 'To Preserve and restore health, 
to seek the cause and cure of disease, to 
educate those who will serve humanity." 
No part of the net earnngs of the corpora- 
tion shall inure to the benefit of, or be 
distributable to, its members, trustees, 
officers, directors, or other private indi- 
viduals. 

No substantial part of the activities of 
the corporation shall be the carrying on of 
propaganda, or otherwise attempting to 
influence legislation, and the corporation 
shall not participate in, or intervene in 
(including the publishing or distribution 
of statements) any political campaign on 
behalf of any candidate for public office. 



Article III 

Members 

Section 1 . Classes 



There shall be three categories of 
members of the MCV Alumni Association- 
Active Member, Associate Member, and 
Honorary Member. 

Section 2. Active Membership 
Active membership shall be conferred 
annually on those alumni presenting pay- 
ment of the annual dues. Membership 
shall be for the calendar year beginning 
with the recorded date of dues receipt. 
Active members shall hold the privileges 
of voting and holding office. 

Section 3. Associate Membership 
All graduates of the Medical college of 
Virginia of VCU are associate members of 
the Association, hold voting privileges, and 
are eligible to become active members of 
the Association upon payment of annual 
dues. 

Section 4. Honorary Membership 
Honorary membership may be granted 
to persons by action of the Board of Trus- 
tees. Honorary members may not vote 
nor hold office. 

Article IV 

Trustees 

The trustees, who shall be selected from 
voting members of the Association, are to 
manage the affairs of the corporation and 
shall be not less than three in number. 
The number of trustees shall be fixed by 
the bylaws, and, in the absence of a bylaw 
fixing the number, the number shall be 30. 
The president, president-elect six vice presi- 
dents from the various schools, immediate 
living past president, secretary, treasurer, 
and assistant treasurer shall be members 
of the Board of Trustees. 

A mail ballot is permitted in elections of 
trustees. 



Article V 

Regulation of Internal Affairs 

The following provisions are made a 
part of these articles of incorporation for 
the regulation of the internal affairs of the 
corporation: 

(a) The corporation, in the discretion 
of its Board of Trustees, may take, accept. 



retain, and hold all or any of the property, 
real or personal, which at any time may be 
given, assigned, transferred, conveyed, be- 
queathed, or devised to, or received by the 
corporation, whether such property is or 
is not of the character or class regarded by 
law as a legal investment for fiduciaries. 

(b) Subject to the provision of Section 
13, 1-246 of the Virginia Code, and the 
amendments thereto, the Board of Trus- 
tees, at any time or from time to time in its 
discretion, may lease, sell, or dispose of all 
or any part of the property, whether real or 
personal, of the corporation and may in- 
vest and reinvest the proceeds from such 
leases, sales, or disposals and moneys 
realized from any other source whatever 
in such property, real or personal, as they 
may deem proper, whether the same is or 
is not of the character or class regarded by 
law as a legal investment for fiduciaries. 



Article VI 

Amendments 

These articles may be amended by a 
plurality of votes by the Board of Trustees 
at any meeting of the board. 



Article VII 

Dissolution 

In the event of the dissolution of the 
corporation, all of its assets not needed for 
the payment of its debts and expenses 
shall be transferred and conveyed to the 
Medical College of Virginia Foundation, if 
such foundation at the time of the dissolu- 
tion of this corporation qualifies under 
Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue 
Code of 1954, and amendments thereto, 
but, if at such time said foundation does 
not qualify, then to such corporations or 
organizations as may qualify under Sec- 
tion 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code 
of 1954, and amendments thereto, at the 
time of dissolution, and in such propor- 
tions as the Board of Trustees in its abso- 
lute discretion shall determine. 



SCARAB 



BYLAWS 

OF THE 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY 



The Board of Trustees endorses these Bylaws. They will be voted on at the 
Association's Annual Meeting, on May 2, 1992, during Reunion '92 Weekend. 



Article I 

Name and Insignia 

Section 1. Name 

The name of this Association shall be the 
Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 
of Virginia Commonwealth University (MCVAA). 

Section 2. Seal 

The seal of the Association shall consist of 
three concentric circles with the words "Sigillum 
Collegii Medicorum Virginiensium" between the 
second and third circle. An imprint of the Egyp- 
tian Building of the College and the date "1838" 
shall be written in the inner circle. 



Article II 



Mission 



Section 1 . The mission of the MCVAA is 
to promote alumni involvement across all areas 
of the University in support of the University's 
mission. 

Section 2. To carry out its mission, the Asso- 
ciation will provide a continuous connection of 
alumni to the University through programs, com- 
munication, and services; promote MCV, individ- 
ual schools, faculty, students, and alumni; pro- 
mote an interdependence among MCV, the Asso- 
ciation, and the University; and provide volunteer 
leadership to promote the University, MCV, 
individual schools, and the Association. 



Article III 

Membership 

Section 1. Classes 

There shall be three categories of members 
of the MCV Alumni Association-Active Member, 
Associate Member, and Honorary Member. 

Section 2. Active Membership 

Active membership shall be conferred annu- 
ally on those alumni presenting payment of the 
annual dues. Membership shall be for the calen- 
dar year beginning with the recorded date of 
dues receipt. Active members shall hold the 
privileges of voting and holding office. 

Section 3. Associate Membership 

All graduates of the Medical College of Vir- 



ginia and/or the Medical College of Virginia of 
VCU are associate members of the Association, 
hold voting privileges, and are eligible to become 
active members of the Association upon payment 
of annual dues. 

Section 4. Honorary Membership 

Honorary membership may be granted to per- 
sons by action of the Board of Trustees. Honor- 
ary members may not vote nor hold office. 



Article IV 

Officers and Elections 

Section 1 . The officers of the Association 
shall be a president, president-elect, vice presi- 
dent representing each of the Association's divi- 
sions, treasurer, assistant treasurer, secretary, 
and immediate past president. 

Section 2. Terms of Office 

The term of office for the president and presi- 
dent-elect shall be one year. The president and 
president-elect shall not be eligible for re-elec- 
tion to those offices. The term of office for secre- 
tary, treasurer, and assistant treasurer shall be 
two years. The secretary, treasurer, and assis- 
tant treasurer may serve a maximum of two terms 
in any one office. The term of office for vice 
president shall be two years. The vice presidents 
for the Divisions of Allied Health Professions, 
Basic Health Sciences, and Medicine shall change 
in odd years; and the Divisions of Dentistry, 
Pharmacy, and Nursing shall change in even 
years. Vice presidents shall not be eligible for re- 
election to that office. 

Section 3. The duties of the officers shall be 

a. The PRESIDENT shall preside at all meet- 
ings of the Board of Trustees and chair the Ex- 
ecutive Committee; shall have general supervi- 
sion of the affairs of the Association under the 
direction of the Board; shall sign or countersign 
all contracts and instruments of the Association; 
shall appoint all committees, with the exception 
of the Executive Committee, and perform all duties 
appropriate to the office or which are properly re- 
quired by the board. 

b. The PRESIDENT-ELECT, in the absence 
of the president, shall perform the duties of the 
president and shall assume the office of presi- 
dent in the event of a vacancy. 

c. The VICE PRESIDENTS shall serve as the 
liaison between the Association and their divi- 



sions and shall perform such duties as assigned 
by the president. 

d. The TREASURER shall oversee all funds 
of the Association; countersign checks of an amount 
determined by the board; present the financial 
status at appropriate meeting of the board; and 
perform all duties appropriate to the office or 
which are properly required by the board. 

e. The ASSISTANT TREASURER shall, in 
the absence of the Treasurer, perform the duties 
of the treasurer and other duties as assigned by 
the president. 

f. The SECRETARY shall direct the issuance 
of notices of all meetings of the board; shall sub- 
mit for approval to the board the minutes of board 
meetings; and shall perform all duties appropri- 
ate to the office. 

g. Officers of the Association shall at no time 
incur any indebtedness on behalf of the Associa- 
tion without approval of the Board of Trustees. 

Section 4. Elections 

a. The OFFICERS of the Association, except 
for the vice presidents, shall be elected by the 
Board of Trustees from a slate drawn from members 
of the board and presented by the Nominating 
Committee at the board meeting immediately 
preceding the annual meeting of the Association. 
The terms of office shall begin with the fiscal 
year. 

b. The VICE PRESIDENTS of the Associa- 
tion shall be the elected presidents or chairs of 
the divisions. The procedure for divisional elec- 
tions shall be consistent with the Bylaws of the 
Association. 

c. The TRUSTEESAT-LARGE of the board 
shall be elected by voting members of the Asso- 
ciation from a slate presented by the Nominating 
Committee. The nominees for trustees-at-large 
shall be distributed by mail to the active and asso- 
ciate members of the association not less than 30 
days prior to May 1 to be returned by May 15. A 
plurality of those votes cast is required for elec- 
tion. 

d. Mail ballot is permitted in voting for trus- 
tees-at-large as set forth in Artice IV, Section 
4(c). 



Article V 

Meetings of the Association 

Section 1. 

a. The annual meeting of the Association shall 
be held at a time designated by the Board of 



SCARAB 



Trustees. 

b. Special meetings of the Association may be 
held on call of the board or on petition of 5 per- 
cent of the active members of the Association. 

c. Notice of all meetings of the Association 
shall be given at the direction of the secretary. 
Notice of special meetings shall state the objec- 
tive of such meetings. Notice of all meetings 
shall be mailed to members not less than 15 days 
prior to the scheduled date of the meetings. 

Section 2. Quorum 

A quorum of any meeting of the Association 
shall consist of 5 percent of active members of 
the Association. 



Article VI 

Board of Trustees 

Section 1. Membership (*See provisio.) 

a. There shall not be more than 36 members 
of the Board of Trustees. 

b. The Board shall consist of the president, 
president-elect, six vice presidents, treasurer, as- 
sistant treasurer, secretary, and 24 trustees-at- 
large elected by the voting members of the Asso- 
ciation. 

c. There shall be trustees-at-large from each 
division. There shall be equal representation 
among the six divisions with four representatives 
from each division. 

d. Terms of office for trustees-at-large shall 
be three years elected by mail ballot by a plural- 
ity of the active and associate members. Trus- 
tees-at-large shall be eligible for service for two 
consecutive terms. 

e. The president of the University, the direc- 
tor of Alumni Activities, and the executive direc- 
tor of the Association shall be ex-officio trustees 
without vote. 

f. Unless otherwise provided in these bylaws, 
unexpired vacancies on the board shall be fdled 
by appointment by the board. 

g. Should any trustee fail to attend more than 
two consecutive meetings without excuse granted 
by the board, the member may be removed by 
action of the board. 

Section 2. Duties 

a. To control the affairs of the Association to 
carry out the mission of the Association; 

b. To establish policies with regard to the op- 
eration of the Association, the Alumni House, 
and management of the Association's resources; 

c. To approve an annual operating budget; 

d. With the director of alumni activities hire 
an executive director to implement policies es- 
tablished by the board and maintain operations of 
the Association, which shall include supervision 
of staff, development of an operating budget, pro- 
gram development and implementation, signing 
of all checks from the operating account, man- 
agement of all publications of the Association, 
coordination of an annual audit by a certified 
public accountant and, providing a report each 
year at the annual meeting; 

e. To authorize and approve the recipients of 
the Outstanding Alumnus Award and the Hodges- 
Kay Award; 

f. To establish, review, and approve changes 
in the programs of the Association consistent 
with the mission of the Association; 

g. To actively promote the general welfare of 
the Association's membership; 



h. To establish the amount of dues. 

Section 3. Meetings 

a. Regular meetings of the board shall be 
held three times a year. A special meeting of the 
board may be called at any time by the president 
of the Association or by written request of three 
or more members of the board. 

b. Notices of meeting shall be mailed at the 
direction of the secretary not less than 15 days 
before any such meeting, and in the case of spe- 
cial meetings, shall state the purpose thereof. 

c. A quorum for any meeting of the board 
shall consist of a majority of trustees, and such 
quorum shall have the power to decide any ques- 
tion which properly may come before the board. 

d. The Student Government Association presi- 
dent shall be invited to all regular meetings of the 
Board of Trustees. The student representative 
shall not have a vote. 

e. The presidents of all chapters shall be 
invited to all meetings of the board. The chapter 
presidents shall not have a vote. 



Article VII 

Executive Committee 

a. The Executive Committee shall consist of 
the officers of the Association. The director of 
alumni activities and executive director of the 
Association shall serve as ex-officio members 
without vote. 

b. The Executive Committee shall exercise 
all powers of the trustees during the intervals be- 
tweens meeting of the board. 

c. Meeting of the Executive Committee shall 
be called at the discretion of the president or 
upon written request by three or more of its 
members. 

d. A quorum of the Executive Committee 
shall consist of a majority of its members. 



Article VIII 

Committees 

Section 1 . There shall be the following com- 
mittees: a Nominating Committee, a Bylaws Com- 
mittee, a Finance Committee, an Audit Commit- 
tee, a Membership Committee, and a Program 
Services Committee. The above committees shall 
serve terms which coincide with the term of the 
president. All committees shall be comprised of 
at least three members of the board. 

Section 2. The Nominating Committee 

a. The Nominating Committee shall be com- 
prised of one representative from each of the divi- 
sions with the immediate past president serving 
as chair. 

b. The Nominating Committee shall prepare 
the slate of nominees for full-term vacancies for 
trustees al large no later than December 1.' each 
year and a slate of nominees for officers no later 
than 30 days prior to the election. 

Section 3. The Bylaws Committee shall re- 
view and propose changes in the Bylaws for con- 
sideration by the board of Trustees and review 
changes in the Bylaws of the divisions to insure 
consistency with the Bylaws of the Association. 

Section 4. The Finance Committee shall pro- 
pose fiscal policy for the Association and re- 



view the budget prior to consideration by the 
board. The budget shall be based on fiscal year 
July 1-June 30. 

Section 5. The Audit Committee shall pro- 
vide for an audit of the accounts and funds of the 
Association and report through the Executive 
Committee to the Board of Visitors of the Univer- 
sity. 

Section 6. The Program Services Committee 
shall propose programs for consideration of the 
board and monitor all programming efforts of the 
Association. 

Section 7. The Membership Committee shall 
propose policy for consideration by the board and 
monitor the membership program. 

Section 8. The Board of Trustees may ap- 
point other committees as necessary. 



Article IX 

Divisions and Chapters 

Section 1. Divisions 

a. The alumni of each of the six schools shall 
organize as divisions and develop bylaws consis- 
tent with the Bylaws of the Association. 

b. The president or chair of each of the 
divisions shall serve as a vice president of the 
Association. 

Section 2. Chapters 

a. The board may authorize the creation of 
chapters of the Association and provide for poli- 
cies with regard to chapters. 

b. The chapters shall conduct business in 
compliance with the Bylaws of the Association. 



Article X 

ParliamentaryAuthority 

Roberts Rules of Order, Newly Revised (Cur- 
rent Edition) shall govern the proceedings of the 
Association in all cases not provided for in the Ar- 
ticles of Incorporation or these Bylaws. 



Article XI 

Amendments 

Unless otherwise provided by statute or the 
Articles of Incorporation, these Bylaws may be 
amended by a two-thirds vote of those present 
and voting at any regular or special meeting of 
the Association, provided 30 days' notice of the 
meeting and such proposed action shall have 
been given in accordance with the Bylaws. Such 
action shall be effective at the close of the meet- 
ing where adopted unless otherwise specified. 

Proviso 

Because the number of members of the Board of 
Trustees currently exceeds the proposed bylaw 
requirement, there shall be no election of board 
members until such time as the Board of Trus- 
tees is reduced to the number of 36 as adopted in 
Article VI unless the number of trustees for a 
particular division falls below what is required by 
these Bylaws. 



10 



SCARAB 



Dean's Co rn er 



School of 

Allied 

Health 

Professions 




Dr. Thomas C. Barker 



There is no question that 1991 was 
among the most memorable years 
in my tenure as dean of the School 
of Allied Health Professions. It was just 
not much fun. Of course, everyone I 
know has had similar experiences. 

We have dealt with declining state 
revenues by budget slashing again and 
again and again. In the School of Allied 
Health Professions, operating funds were 
nearly eliminated. Two undergraduate 
programs, health information systems 
and health care management, are being 
phased out completely. 

In addition, during the 1991-92 aca- 
demic year the school is losing 106 
combined years of experience because 
of the retirement of four faculty. Jerry L. 
Norville retired as chairperson of the 
Department of Health Administration in 
June 1991. The chairperson of the De- 
partment of Medical Technology, Donna 
Odom, also retired in June. James L. 
Dunn, director of external affairs for the 
school, retired in October. On June 30, 
1992, Marianne MacDonald will retire 
from the faculty of the Department of 
Physical Therapy. 

Each of these people has contributed 
significantly to the school in his or her 
individual job. The loss of more than 
100 years of combined experience cre- 
ates a void which will be difficult to fill. 
In addition, under the conditions of the 
state's early retirement program, these 
positions are no longer available to the 
school. 

Even with difficult financial circum- 
stances the faculty have continued to 
achieve remarkable accomplishments 
beyond the classroom in their research 
and in professional and public service. 
Their accomplishments are exemplary. 

The financial support of those who 
studied in the departments of the School 
of Allied Health Professions has made it 
possible for us to continue to provide for 
the needs of our students and faculty. 
Never before has private financial 



support been so critical to the educa- 
tional program. For example, the long- 
planned renovation of the Grant House, 
the former Sheltering Arms Hospital 
building on Clay Street, is under way 
because of the financial support provided 
by alumni and friends of the Department 
of Health Administration. Student re- 
search projects are possible in the De- 
partment of Occupational Therapy be- 
cause of private financial support. Also, 
mini-scholarships are available in the 
Department of Gerontology. These few 
examples illustrate the importance of 
private financial support of the school. 

Students' special needs continue to 
grow. Students who have to depend on 
part-time employment have experienced 
difficulty in finding or retaining jobs. They 
constitute a segment of the work force 
that has been impacted by downsizing 
or reductions. Economic conditions have 
created stress among students. Students 
have sought additional forms of finan- 
cial aid to meet their increased needs. 

While the need for additional finan- 
cial resources has grown in the School 
of Allied Health Professions, many who 
have provided support in the past have 
found themselves in a position of being 
unable to continue their assistance. 
Alumni who were called during the 1991- 
92 annual giving phonathon pledged 
nearly $12,000, just shy of the amount 
pledged last year. 

National attention has been directed 
to careers in the allied health profes- 
sions the past several months. This is 
good. Perhaps this is a result of "Allied 
Health Services: Avoiding Crises," the 
national study mandated by Congress 
and conducted by the Institute of Medi- 
cine last year. The demand for health 
care continues, and more health care 
professionals are needed to deliver the 
care. Employment opportunities are ex- 
cellent. This year, the School of Allied 

Continued on page 28 



11 



SCARAB 



Dean's Co rn er 



School of 

Basic 

Health 

Sciences 




, *?f ^V 



is J 



Dr. S. Gaylen Bradley 



The alumni, faculty, staff, and 
students of the School of Basic 
Health Sciences continue to make 
a mark for themselves nationally and 
within Virginia Commonwealth Univer- 
sity. Dr. Karl Peace (biostatistics, 1976) 
returned to campus in November 1991 
to receive one of the "Stars" bestowed 
upon outstanding alumni. Dr. Chris 
Gennings (biostatistics, 1986) joined the 
faculty as a tenure-track assistant profes- 
sor. Dr. Mary Snyder Shall (anatomy, 
199 1) is now assistant professor of physi- 
cal therapy, in the School of Allied Health 
Professions on the MCV Campus. Dr. 
Cynthia Morton (human genetics, 1982) 
has been named the Outstanding Alum- 
nus of the School of Basic Health Sci- 
ences for 1992. Dr. Morton is at Har- 
vard University pursuing research on 
molecular human genetics. Ms. Marga- 
rette Goodwin (senior administrator. 
School of Basic Health Sciences) served 
as an intern in the State Council of Higher 
Education for Virginia (SCHEV) for five 
months. She had the opportunity to work 
with SCHEV staff on a number of issues 
important to the University. 

Kimberly Walker (graduate student 
in microbiology and immunology) re- 
ceived the American Society for Micro- 
biology Predoctoral Minority Fellowship 
for the second time. The School of Basic 
Health Sciences has four students from 
Bristol Polytechnic Institute here on a 
cooperative agreement, facilitated by a 
former faculty member (Paul Phibbs, 
professor and chair of microbiology and 
immunology at East Carolina University) 
and consummated by Dr. Jan Chlebow- 
ski (professor of biochemistry and mo- 
lecular biophysics). Three of the stu- 
dents are working in biochemistry and 
molecular biophysics and one in 
microbiology and immunology. Ms. 
Nancy Koster (physiology) has been 
named a Commonwealth Fellow by the 
SCHEV. Ms. Koster is one of 11 persons 
statewide to be selected. Ms. Sally 



Hunsberger (biostatistics) was selected 
a recipient of the student awards given 
by the Eastern North American Region 
of the Biometrics Society. Our biostatis- 
tics graduate students have a spectacu- 
lar record of winning ENAR student 
awards. 

Dr. John DeSimone, professor of physi- 
ology, has made significant progress in 
understanding the reason that common 
table salt tastes saltier than other so- 
dium salts. Dr. DeSimone was recently 
appointed to the Sensory Disorders and 
Language Study Section of the National 
Institutes of Health. Dr. Everette L. May, 
professor of pharmacology and toxicol- 
ogy, received the Alfred Burger Award 
in Medicinal Chemistry, for his contri- 
butions to analgesics and antimalarial 
research. The award is sponsored by 
Smith Wine Beecham Pharmaceuticals. 
Dr. Louis Harris, professor and chair of 
pharmacology and toxicology, was pre- 
sented the Governor's Award for his 
research on chemical dependency. The 
award was presented in Richmond by L. 
Douglas Wilder, Governor of the Com- 
monwealth. Dr. Phillip Hylemon, pro- 
fessor of microbiology and immunology, 
was the 1991 recipient of the Outstand- 
ing Scientist of Virginia award, presented 
by the Science Museum of Virginia. Dr. 
Hylemon received this award for his 
outstanding research on bile salt me- 
tabolism. Prior recipients from the School 
of Basic Health Sciences include Dr. Barry 
Wolf (professor of human genetics). Dr. 
Judith Bond (formerly professor of bio- 
chemistry and molecular biophysics and 
now professor and head of biochemistry 
and nutrition at Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University), and Dr. 
Francis Macrina (professor and chair of 
microbiology and immunology). Dr. S. 
Gaylen Bradley (dean of Basic Health 
Sciences) was named an 1991 Outstand- 
ing Alumnus of Southwest Missouri State 

Continued on page 28 



12 



SCARAB 



CANDIDATES 



ior the 

MCV Alumni 

Association 

ot VCU 

Board ot Trustees 



Each trustee represents approximately 600 living alumni of the six schools. Mail your ballot to the 
MCV Alumni Association of VCU, MCV Box 156, Richmond, VA 23298-0156, by May 15, 1992 




Allied Health Professions 

Trustee Candidates 

(Vote for 5.) 

Rex J. Bennett (PC'82) Resident Chaplain 
and Personnel Manager, Joseph W. Bliley 
Funeral Homes, Inc. 

Becky T. Perdue (MT62) 

Laboratory Director, Hen 
rico Doctors' Hospital. Serv- 
ice to MCV: member 
MCVAA Board of Trustees 
member. Finance Commit- 
tee; member, Ad Hoc Medi 
cal Technology Curriculum 
Program Committee; lec- 
turer, Medical Technology Program. Mem- 
berships: American Society for Medical Tech- 
nology; Alpha-Mu-Tau professional fraternity 
for Medical Technologists; American Society 
for Medical Technology; Clinical Laboratory 
Management Association; National Associa- 
tion for Female Executives. Honors: Mem- 
ber of the Year, Virginia Society for Medical 
Technology; Sherwood Achievement Award 
for Laboratory Administration. Offices held: 
vice president, secretary/treasurer, American 
Society for Medical Technology; president, 
Virginia Society for Medical Technology. 

Debra M. Powell (OT75) 

State Program Director of 
Occupational and Speech 
Therapy, Rehab Manage- 
ment Inc. Service to MCV: 
member, MCVAA Board of 
Trustees; staff therapist (1 
year), MCV-Rehab Hospital; 
clinical faculty member. 
School of Occupational Therapy; member, 1992 
Occupational Therapy Reunion Committee. 




Catherine P. Saunders 

(MS'82) Special Assistant 
to the Commissioner, Vir- 
ginia Department for the 
Aging. Service to MCV: 
member, MCVAA Board of 
;, Trustees; president, Geron- 
^j|j tology Program Alumni 1983- 
'"'^ 88. Memberships: presi- 
dent, Virginia Association on Aging; Virginia 
Coalition for the Aging; Virginia Institute for 
Adult Day Care. Honors: Outstanding Geron- 
tology Alumnus 1987. 

Billie H. Vaughan (MT77),CLS(NCA) Ad 

ministrative Laboratory Director, Stuart Circle 
Hospital. Service to MCV: member, MCVAA 
Board of Trustees; vice president. Allied Health 
Professions Division; student coordinator in 
hematology; guest lecturer, 8 years MCVH. 
Memberships: American Society of Medical 
Technicians; Virginia Society of Medical Tech- 
nicians; Richmond Society of Medical Techni- 
cians. 

William E. Willis (HA'57) Senior Advisor, 
Tidewater Health Care, Inc. Memberships: 
past president, chairman, Virginia Hospital 
Association; past president. Tidewater Hospi- 
tal Council; fellow, American College of Hospi- 
tal Administrators; president, secretary/treas- 
urer, Maryland-Virginia-District of Columbia 
Hospital Association; Virginia Public Health 
Association; American Public Health Associa- 
tion; Tidewater Health Education Committee; 
United Way. Honors: Who's Who in the 
South and Southwest; Personalities of the South; 
Notable Americans of the Bicentennial Era; 
Men of Achievement; Dictionary of Interna- 
tional Biography; Who's Who in Heath Care. 




Basic Health Sciences 
Trustee Candidate 

(Vote for I.) 

Terry W. Woodworth 
(PhD'82) Assistant Direc- 
tor, Institute of Biotechnol- 
ogy, Virginia Center for 
Innovative Technology. 
Service to MCV: member, 
MCVAA Board of Trustees; 
assistant to dean. School of 
Basic Health Sciences. Hon- 
ors: Beckman Postdoctoral Fellow, Univer- 
sity of California; Alpha Sigma Chi Honorary 
Leadership Society; outstanding teaching as- 
sistant, Rho Chi Pharmacy Honor Society; Char- 
les C. Clayton Predoctoral Fellowship, School 
of Basic Health Sciences; honorable mention. 
National Science Foundation Predoctoral Fel- 
lowship; Alpha Chi Scholastic Honor Society, 
Beta Beta Beta Biological Science Honor Soci- 
ety; Old Dominion University Alumni Associa- 
tion Merit Scholar. 



Bental 

Trustee Candidates 

(Vote for 4.) 

Douglas S. Belt (D'74) Private practice. 
Service to MCV: part-time instructor, School 
of Dentistry. Memberships: Richmond Den- 
tal Society; Advisory Board, Salvation Army; 
Advisory Council; Salvation Army Boys and 
Girls Clubs. 



13 



SCARAB 



William D. Covington (D'62) Private prac- 
tice. Service to MCV: member. Board of 
Trustees, MCVAA; director. Dental Division, 
MCVAA. 

Bruce R. Deginder (D'88) Private practice. 
Memberships: American Dental Association; 
Virginia Dental Association; Board, Virginia 
Academy of General Dentistry; secretary, Pen- 
insula Dental Society; Colonial Kiwanis; Young 
Dentists Committee. 

Jeffrey L. Hudgins (D'80) Private practice. 
Service to MCV: clinical instructor. School of 
Dentistry 1980-85; promoted to assistant clini- 
cal professor 1985. 



Medical 

Trustee Candidates 



(Vote for I.) 

Phillip E. Boyd Byrd, Jr. (M'69), Chief, 
Special Procedures and Radiation Safety Offi- 
cer, St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, MD. 
Memberships: member, Board of Trustees, 
McDonogh School, McDonogh, MD.; mem- 
ber, Radiation Control Advisory Board, State 
of Maryland, Department of the Environment; 
Baltimore City Medical Society, Maryland 
Radiological Society; American College of 
Radiology; Society of Cardiovascular & Inter- 
ventional Radiology; American Heart Associa- 
tion, Radiology Section. Son, Boyd, is a fresh- 
man medical student at MCV. 

Michele Alana Romano (M'84) Private group 
practice, Heritage Family Practice Associates, 
P.C., Fairfax, VA. Service to MCV: member, 
Medical School Advisory Council; director. 
Medical Division, MCV Alumni Association. 
Memberships: American Academy of Family 
Practice; Fairfax County Medical Society; 
member. Medical Staff Executive Committee, 
Fair Oaks Hospital, Fairfax, VA Honors: Board 
Certification, American Board of Family Prac- 
tice, 1987; Alpha Omega Alpha, National Medical 
School Scholastic Honor Society, junior year; 
Beta Beta Beta, Biological Honor Society. 



Nursing 

Trustee Candidates 



(Vote for 5.) 

Barbara H. Dunn (N'70; MSN'74; PhD'84) 

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner. Virginia Depart- 
ment of Health, Three Rivers Health District. 
Service to MCV: taught, School of Nursing 



1976-83; associate professor, 1985-86; mem- 
ber, Centennial Nursing Committee. Honors: 
Outstanding Nurse Alumni Award 1982. 

Virginia Robbins Foster (N'64) Director of 
Nursing, Richmond Eye & Ear Hospital. Serv- 
ice to MCV: 1974, 1989 reunion chairman for 

N'64. 

Martha B. Gibbons (MSN, PNP Certifi- 
cate '77; PhD) Pediatric-Psychiatric Liaison 
with National Institutes of Health. 

Josephine Lee Hargis (N'55) Director of 
Nursing, Eastern State Hospital, Williamsburg, 
VA. Memberships: Historical Committee, 
National League for Nursing; American Nurses 
Association; Advisory Council, American Jour- 
nal of Nursing; secretary, Commission on 
Human Rights; Nominating Committee, Dis- 
trict 10 Board of Directors, Virginia Nurses 
Association; Virginia Nusese Coalition for Action 
in Politics; American Red Cross; Board of Di- 
rectors, Williamsburg Unit, American Cancer 
Society. 

Mildred A. Hopkins 
(N'53) Director of Roanoke 
Site and Administrative As- 
sistant, Radford University 
School of Nursing. Service 
to MCV: member, Board of 
Trustees MCVAA past staff 
nurse, MCVH. Member- 
ships: Sigma Theta Tau; 
treasurer, Virginia League for Nursing; Na- 
tional League for Nursing; Nursing Education 
and Patient Care Services Council and Career 
Ladder Committee; Roanoke Memorial Hos- 
pitals; Roanoke Council of Community Serv- 
ices. Honors: Delta Kappa Gamma Interna- 
tional Society for Women Educators; Phi Kappa 
Phi Honor Society; Who's Who in American 
Nursing; recognition of educational contribu- 
tions by Assembly of Hospital Schools of Nurs- 
ing in Virginia. 

Shirley Odell Welker (N'58; MSN'78; 
GEC) Director, Riverside School of Profes- 
sional Nursing, Newport News, VA. Service 
to MCV: staff nurse, head nurse, Emergency 
Department. MCVH; member, Board of Trus- 
tees MCVAA. Memberships: Virginia Nurses 
Association; American Nurses Association; Na- 
tional League for Nursing; Virginia League for 
Nursing; Assembly of Hospital Schools of Nurs- 
ing of Virginia; The Century Club, American 
Nurses Foundation, Inc.; Gerontological Soci- 
ety of America. Honors: TWIN Award, Trib- 
ute to Women in Business and Industry; re- 
search cited in Burnside, Irene M.: Nursing 
and the Aged; Sigma Theta Tau, MCV nursing 
honor society. 




Janet B. Younger (N'67; MSN'72; PhD) 

Associate Professor, Maternal-Child Nursing 
MCVH. Service to MCV: past member, Board 
of Trustees, MCVAA; past president. Nursing 
Division, MCVAA; 1977 reunion chairman for 

N'67. 



Pharmacy 
Trustee Candidates 



(Vote for 3.) 

Alice Graham Glenn (P'63) Owned and 
operated with husband, Robert 0. Glenn, Jr. 
(P'64), Lafayette Pharmacy 1971-86; previously 
director of pharmacy, St. Elizabeth's Hospital; 
formerly director of pharmacy services at Met- 
ropolitan Hospital. Among first in the area to 
establish unit dose medication system for nurs- 
ing home and hospital patients and to comput- 
erize a retail pharmacy. Service to MCV: 
secretary/treasurer, Pharmacy Division 
MCVAA; employee, MCVH Pharmacy, 1963- 
68. 

Virginia Nuara Hudert (P'63) Pharmacist, 
Retreat Hospital. Service to MCV: past secre- 
tary/treasurer, Pharmacy Division MCVAA. 

Alain Louka (P'77) Pharmacist, Safeway 
Stores, Inc. 



% 



Richard B. Rice (P'58) 

Owner/operator of Syca- 
more Cardinal Drugs. Serv- 
2 £S «£ i ce to MCV: director, Phar- 

I'<Sj» macy Division MCVAA. 

Memberships: past presi- 
KVh| dent, Richmond Pharmaceu- 
fc tical Association; National 
Hk M. ^H Association of Retail Drug- 
gists; Virginia Pharmaceutical Association; 
Midlothian Rotary Club; Chesterfield Business 
Council. Honors: drug topics honor roll of in- 
dependent pharmacy superstars; Who's Who 
in the South and Southwest; 1987 Paul Harris 
Fellow Award. 

Jay T. (Tommy) Thompson III (P'80) 

Owner/operator Mechanicsville Drug Store. 
Memberships: Virginia Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation; past president, Richmond Pharmaceu- 
tical Association; National Association of Re- 
tail Druggists; American Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation; Board of Trustees, Humana Hospi- 
tal. Honors: Bowl of Hygeia Award 1986; 
MCV School of Pharmacy Alumni Star 1991. 



11 



TRUSTEES BALLOT 



Ballot for candidates for the MCV Alumni Association of VCU Board of Trustees for terms beginning July 1, 1992, and ending 
June 30, 1995. Please place an X in the blank in front of the name of the candidates of your choice in each division. 

Those eligible to vote according to the May 14, 1983, amendments of the Articles of Incorporation of the MCV Alumni 
Association of VCU, Article III, Members, Section 2: "Active members shall be comprised of all graduates of the institution and 
all former students who attended at least two semesters. They shall have the privilege of voting and of holding office." 



Allied Health Professions 


Dental 


Nursing 


Trustee Candidates (Vote for 5.) 


Trustee Candidates (Vote for 4.) 


Trustee Candidates (Vote for 5.) 


_ Rex J. Bennett (PC82) 


_ Douglas S. Belt (D74) 


_ Barbara H. Dunn (N70; PhD'84) 


Becky T. Perdue (MT'62) 


William D. Covington (D'62) 


Virginia Robbins Foster (N'64) 


(for re-election) 


(for re-election) 


_ Martha B. Gibbons (MSN; 


_ Debra M. Powell (OT75) 


_ Bruce R. Deginder (D'88) 


PNP Certificate 77; PhD) 


(for re-election) 


Jeffrey L. Hudgins (D'80) 


Josephine Lee Hargis (N'55) 


_ Catherine P. Saunders (MS'82) 




(for re-election) 


(for re-election) 




Mildred A. Hopkins (N'53) 


_ Billie H. Vaughan (MT77) 


(Write-in) 


(for re-election) 


(for re-election) 




Shirley Odell Welker (N'58; 


_ William E. Willis (HA57) 




MSN78; GEC86) 




Medical 


(for re-election) 




Trustee Candidates (Vote for 1.) 


Janet B. Younger (N'67; MSN72; 


Basic Health Sciences 




PhD) 




Phillip E. Boyd Byrd, Jr. (M'69) 






Michele Alana Romano (M'84) 


Pharmacy 

Trustee Candidates (Vote for 3.) 


Terry W. Woodworth (PhD'82) 

(for re-election) 








Alice Graham Glenn (P'63) 




Please return no later than May 15, 1992, to the 
Pharmacy Division, MCV Alumni Association of 


Virginia Nuara Hudert (P'63) 


(Write-in) 


(for re-election) 
Alain Louka (P77) 




VCU, MCV Box 156, Richmond, VA 23298-0156. 



MEDICAL DIVISION BALLOT 



For director to serve from July 1, 1992-June 30, 1995. 
(Vote for Three.) 

Dr. Eloise C. Haun, M'62, Woodstock, VA 

Dr. Glenn W. Hurt, M'64, Richmond, VA 

Dr. Michele Romano, M'84, Fairfax Station, VA 

Dr. Bruce S. West, M'86, Richmond, VA 

This ballot has been prepared from the report of the Medical 
Division Nominating Committee chaired by Dr. Wesley C. 
Bernhart in accordance with both the Rules and Procedures 
of the Division and the Bylaws of the MCV Alumni Associa- 
tion of VCU. 



Please return no later than May 15, 1992, to the Pharmacy 
Division, MCV Alumni Association of VCU, MCV Box 156, 
Richmond, VA 23298-0156. 



PHARMACY DIVISION BALLOT 



For director-at-large to serve from July 1, 1992-June 
30, 1994. (Vote For Three.) 

Beverly Zweig Adato, P77, Petersburg, VA 

Jerry W. Martin, P'88, Mechanicsville, VA 

Richard Rice, P'58, Midlothian, VA 



(Write-in) 

This ballot has been prepared from the report of the Phar- 
macy Division Nominating Committee chaired by Mrs. 
Bertha C. Rolfe in accordance with both the Rules and 
Procedures of the Division and the Bylaws of the MCV 
Alumni Association of VCU. 



Please return no later than May 15, 1992, to the Pharmacy 
Division, MCV Alumni Association of VCU, MCV Box 156, 
Richmond, VA 23298-0156. 



15 



CAPSULES 



SCARAB 



Mini-Med School in Progress 




Dr. Jack Haar, Department of Anat- 
omy, prepares for his Mini-Med 
School lecture, using a skeleton, 
calcifed bones, and other props to 
enhance his lecture. A free series 
of lectures developed for the pub- 
lic, Mini-Med School was filled 
quickly, and a long waiting list for 
the next one developed almost 
overnight. The second such pro- 
gram developed in the United 
States, the MCV Campus Mini- 
Med School is sponsored by VCU, 
Whitby Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and 
the Science Museum of Virginia. 
It includes a tour of the MCV 
Campus during the final class. 



Pharmacy Open House 
Draws a Large Crowd! 

On November 16, 1991, the School of 
Pharmacy held its annual Fall Open 
House; and once again it was a huge 
success. Parents, alumni, and friends 
enjoyed self-guided walking tours of the 
campus and the many nearby historical 



Left Dr. Peter 
Byron has an 
interested audi- 
ence during the 
laboratory tour. 
Right Dean 
Ruggiero talks 
with an uniden- 
tified friend at 
the Pharmacy 
Fall Open 
House. 



Community Learning Week 
Features Dr. Jean L. Harris 

Dr. Jean L. Harris (M'55) , the first African- 
American graduate of the School of Medi- 
cine, was the guest speaker during the 
University's presentation of The National 
Health Care Debate: Implications for the 
African-American Community, during Com- 
munity Learning Week on January 16. Dr. 



sites. The Robert Blackwell Smith, Jr., 
Building was open to tour laboratories, 
have blood pressures taken, and choles- 
terols screened. The fun continued into 
the evening with a casino and auction, 
refreshments, and dancing. All who at- 
tended enjoyed seeing and meeting fac- 
ulty members and gaining new insights 
into the profession of pharmacy and its 
changing role in the '90s. 




Harris, a former MCV Campus faculty 
member and former Virginia Secretary of 
Human Resources, was joined by Dr. 
Stephen Ayres, dean, School of Medicine. 
Dr. Harris, previously chief executive 
officer of the Ramsey Foundation in St. 
Paul, Minnesota, assumed the position of 
senior associate director and director of 
medical affairs at the University of Minne- 
sota Hospitals and Clinics effective Janu- 
ary 20, 1992. 




Povlishock Bass 



Convocation Honors 
Faculty 

Two faculty from each campus were hon- 
ored at the University's annual convoca- 
tion on February 19. This year's award 
recipients are Dr. John T Povlishock, School 
of Basic Health Sciences, University Award 
of Excellence; Dr. R. Gerald Bass, College 
of Humanities and Sciences, Distinguished 
Service Award; Dr. Linda S. Costanzo, School 
of Basic Health Sciences, Distinguished 
Teaching Award; and Ms. Elizabeth C. King, 
School of the Arts, Distinguished Scholar 
Award. 

President Eugene P. Trani gave the key- 
note address at the ceremony, which fea- 
tured music performed by the VCU Sym- 
phonic Wind Ensemble and the Choral Arts 
Society. 

Dr. Povlishock has spent his career open- 
ing new avenues in brain trauma research 
and is the author of more than 90 papers, 
chapters, and books. His research covers 
fields such as neurosurgery, pharmacol- 
ogy, physiology, chemistry, and biology. 
He is a peer reviewer and site visitor for 
the National Institutes of Health and a found- 
ing member of the Neurotrauma Society. 
In addition. Dr. Povlishock is editor-in-chief 
of the Journal of Neurotrauma. 

He was the winner of the first Jacob 
Javits Neuroscience Award for 1983-90 and 
a second award for 1990-97. Dr. Povlis- 
hock has also received numerous other 
research grants and awards and is an ex- 
cellent teacher, frequently speaking to the 
public as well as to his students. 

Named VCU's Distinguished Teacher 
in 1983, he has also received outstanding 
teacher awards in the Schools of Medicine 
and Dentistry on a regular basis. Since 
arriving in 1973, Dr. Povlishock has also 
been actively involved as a member 
of various committees and the Faculty 
Senate. 

Since coming to Richmond Professional 
Institute in 1962, Dr. Bass has been in- 
strumental in developing undergraduate 
and doctoral programs in chemistry and a 
research program in organic chemistry. 

Chairman of the 1967-68 Academic 



16 




Costanzo 



Senate, Dr. Bass helped establish faculty 
governance structures at VCU. He has 
since been active on issues ranging from 
academic integrity to the current budget 
crisis. He is a visible member of the Vir- 
ginia Academy of Sciences and has brought 
a large regional conference of the Ameri- 
can Chemical Society to VCU. Dr. Bass 
also works with middle and high school 
students, encouraging them to enjoy sci- 
ence. 

It would be difficult to find a teaching 
award presented at VCU that Dr. Costanzo 
hasn't won, according to her colleagues. 
She has consistently been recognized by 
first- and second-year medical students for 
her challenging and impressive lectures 
and has been honored as Best Physiology 
Professor, Most Outstanding Coursemas- 
ter, and the professor with the "Best Sylla- 
bus of the Year." 

A member of the Curriculum Council 
for the Schools of Medicine and Basic Health 
Sciences and a member of the School of 
Medicine's Admissions Commnittee, Dr. 
Costanzo also serves as the curriculum co- 
ordinator for first- and second-year medi- 
cal students. 

An author of numerous articles and 
publications in the field of physiology, she 
has also written review chapters to be 
published later this year in The Handbook 
of Physiology and The Kidney: Physiology 
and Pathophysiology. 

Ms. King has learned porcelain slip- 
casting; bronze casting; wood carving and 
construction; modeling in wax, clay, and 
plaster; precision metal machining; and 
soldering, all in order to complete her 
sculptures. 

Her diverse interests have led her to 
examine Renaissance portraiture and anat- 
omy, the design of European wooden 
mannequins and nineteenth-century automa- 
tons, Japanese bunraku puppetry, and pho- 
tography done inside the body using fiber 
optics. 

Ms. King has had seven solo exhibits 
and has been featured in several impor- 
tant regional group shows, including "Un/ 
Common Ground, Virginia Artists 1990" 
at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. 

Convocation has been an annual event 
at VCU since 1982. 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 


OF VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY 






BALANCE SHEETS 








2 June 3 0, 1991 and 1990 1 




1991 




1990 


ASSETS 








Current Assets 








Cash 


57,967 




63,135 


Accounts receivable 


4,797 




9,775 


Inventories - souvenir glasses and prints 


2,265 




2,637 


Prepaid insurance 


1,253 




2,523 


Total Current Assets 


S 66,282 


$ 


78,070 


Investments and Other Assets 








Investments 


951,202 




629,949 


Deferred charge 


119,245 




20,680 


Total Investments and Other Assets 


$ 1,070,447 


$ 


650,629 


Property and Equipment 








Land 


15.070 




5,070 


Building - 1105 East Clay Street 


58,979 




58,979 


Building equipment 


13,893 




13,893 


Office equipment 


34,414 




28,234 


Paving - parking lot 


420 




420 




S 122,776 


$ 


106,596 


Less accumulated depreciation 


100,992 




99,537 


Total Property and Equipment 


S 21,784 


$ 


7,059 




$ 1,158,153 


$ 


735,758 


LIABILITIES AND FUND 


BALANCES 






Current Liabilities 








Accounts payable 


9,039 




15.552 


Deferred revenue 


19,428 




3.067 


Total Current Liabilities 


$ 28,467 


$ 


18,619 


COMMITMENT 








FUND BALANCES 








General fund 


122,425 




82,885 


Designated funds: 








Walker Award 


6,635 




6,557 


Alumni Memorial Student 


6,045 




5,789 


Scholarship funds: 








West Virginia 


1,847 




1.700 


Herman Hertzberg 


11,372 




10.914 


Oscar W. Ward, Sr. 


8.993 




8,268 


Building fund 


958.896 




588,209 


Building maintenance fund 


13,833 




12,817 


! Total Fund Balances 


$ 1,130,046 


$ 


717,139 




$ 1,158,513 


$ 


735,758 



17 



CALL FOR NOMINATIONS 



Nurse Alumni Awards 



Nursing Division of the Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 
of Virginia Commonwealth University 



Outstanding Nurse 
Alumni Award 

This award is presented during the spring reunion weekend in 
recognition of a successful nursing career. The recipeint is rec- 
ognized as a leader and expert, has contributed to health- 
related and other groups, and has impacted the nursing profes- 
sion with creativity and innovation. 

Nurse Alumni Award for 
Outstanding Clinical Practice 

This award is presented during spring reunion weekend in rec- 
ognition of outstanding nursing practice in the clinical arena. 
The recipient exemplifies an innovative, professional, and 
scholarly approach to his or her clinical practice and contrib- 
utes to the development of others. 



Nurse Alumni Award for 
Outstanding Service 

This award is presented during the spring reunion weekend to 
an alumnus (a) who has shown outstanding leadership and 
service to the community, the school or University, profes- 
sional or community organizations. 



Alumni "Star" Award 

This award is presented to a recent graduate (within 15 years) 
who has made significant achievement in his or her career, in 
the community, or in service to the University. The award is 
presented annually at the Founders' Day Gala during the first 
weekend in November. 



YOUR 
NAME 



YOUR ADDRESS OR 
PHONE NUMBER 



Please provide a way for the Awards Committee to contact you if there are any questions about your nomination. 



NOMINATIONS 



Outstanding Nurse Alumni Award 

Nominee 



Nurse Alumni Award for Outstanding Clinical Practice 

Nominee 



Nurse Alumni Award for Outstanding Service 

Nominee 
Address 

Alumni "Star" Award 

Nominee 
Address 



DEADLINE APRIL 17, 1992 



Please 
referen 


use this space to desc 
ces. A copy of the no 


nbe your noi 
ninee's resu 


ninee or provide the 
me or vitae would be 


lames of oth 
very helpful 



Additional Sheets may be attached if needed 



Please return to School of Nursing Alumni Awards Committee, 
MCV Alumni Association, MCV Box 156, Richmond, VA 23298-0156 



18 



ALUMNI UPDATE 



SCARAB 



1932 



Minnie Esther Thorne (N) of Elm City, 
North Carolina, was honored with a 90th 
birthday celebration on November 3, 1991. 



1939 



Irene L. (M) and Albert A. Kossove 
(M'38) of Charlotte, North Carolina, re- 
tired after 50 years of medical practice. 



1940 



Herman J. Flax (M) of North Bethesda, 
Maryland, received the Recognition Award 
for Distinguished Clinicians of the Ameri- 
can Academy of Physical Medicine and 
Rehabilitation at the Academy's annual as- 
sembly on October 30, 1991. The award is 
given to honor those who have achieved 
distinction through scholarly teaching and 
outstanding performance in patient care 
activities. 



1942 



W. Nelson Ridinger (P) of Chris- 
tiansburg sold his drugstore in July 1991 
to Jo Anne W. (P'67) and Allen N. But- 
terfield (P'67) and is enjoying retirement. 
He is still a director at First National Bank, 
enjoys golf, horseback riding, and manag- 
ing his 160-acre farm. 



1947 



William W. McClure (M) of Washing- 
ton, D.C., has retired from active practice 
as medical director of Hospice of North- 
ern Virginia. 



1954 



Pendleton Emmett Thomas III (M), 
formerly chief of obstetrics and gynecol- 
ogy at Henrico Doctors' Hospital, has been 
elected president of the medical staff there. 
Dr. Thomas is in solo private practice of 
gynecological surgery in Richmond; he 
and wife Jacalyn have one daughter, Mary 
Catherine, who is currently a nursing stu- 
dent on the MCV Campus. 



1957 



James L. Lynde (M) of Lynchburg has 
been named a fellow of the American Col- 
lege of Radiology for his outstanding con- 
tributions to the field. 



1961 



Roger D. Neathawk (P; M'78), presi- 
dent of Market Strategies, Inc., has been 
named as a certified member in the profes- 
sional achievement program developed by 
the American Society for Health Care Mar- 



keting and Public Relations. MSI is a full- 
service advertising, marketing, and public 
relations firm based in Richmond. Dr. 
Neathawk is one of the founding partners. 



1965 

R. Stuart Weeks (M) of La Mesa, Cali- 
fornia, has been elected chief of staff at the 
Alvarado Hospital Medical Center in San 
Diego. 



1966 



Jerri Barden-Perkins (M) recently 
joined the Board of Directors at Zucchaeus 
Free Medical Clinic in Washington, D.C. 
She and husband John C. Perkins, MD, 
voluntarily see patients once a month. 

Elise Mobberley Yiasemides (N) of 
Annapolis, Maryland, is working at the 
Department of Labor in Washington, D.C, 
as a science specialist in Occupational Safety 
and Health Administration, one of only 
two nursing positions in the national OSHA 
office. She has two children, Tanya and 
Kimon. 



1968 



Peter S. Trager (D) of Marietta, Geor- 
gia, was awarded fellowship in the Ameri- 
can College of Dentists in October 1991. 



Marriott People 
know how 
to bring you 
their best. 




The best rooms, the best food, the 
best recreation and the best meeting 
facilities available. These are all 
superlatives. And they are all true. In 
every area, in every way, you will not 
find a better lodging experience 
than Marriott. 

Because Marriott people know how 

From the first impression to the 
lasting memories of an unforgettable 
stay, there is no question that the 
experience, taste and training of every 
Marriott person is a key reason 
people like you return to Marriott 
again and again. 

We have earned our reputation 
through performance. 

Performance around the world. 
And here at home. 

It is simply a matter of knowing how. 



RICHMOND^moft 

500 East Broad Street, RichlTO >nd, Virginia 23219 (HO-i ) 643-3400 



19 



1969 



Martha E. Colvin (N) of Richmond was 
part of a ceremony to honor women veter- 
ans at McGuire Veterans Affairs Medical 
Center. Ms. Calvin, who turned 21 while 
serving in Vietnam, is now a nurse man- 
ager in the women and adult unit at the 
Psychiatric Institute of Richmond. The 
ceremony was the first of its kind in the 
Richmond area. 

Ike Koziol (M) has been appointed 
chief of the Urology Section at St. Mary's 
Hospital in Richmond. He and wife Judith 
have two children, Michael, a senior at the 
University of Georgia, and Robert, a fresh- 
man at Ithaca College. 



1970 



Jane Long Mendez-Picon (N) has been 
selected as a member of the National Cer- 
tification Corporation OB-Gyn Committee. 
She is currently employed in Labor and 
Delivery as a Clinical Nurse IV on the 
MCV Campus. 



1975 



Kathleen Wickert Snow (N) and hus- 
band Peter announce the birth of their 
fourth son, James Peter, on November 24, 
1991. Mrs. Snow works part time for the 
HMO, Kaiser-Permanente, as an advice 
nurse. The Snows reside in Herndon with 
Matthew, age 11, and twins Robert and 
Thomas, age four. 



1976 



Steven von Elten (M), a board certified 
family practice physician, has passed the 
certification examination in emergency 
medicine. He is on the staff at Fauquier 
Hospital in Warrenton. 



1977 



Mary K. Hall (N) retired from the U.S. 
Navy on April 1, 1990, and resides in San 
Diego. 



1979 



Sheree Dixon (MT) and Robert Lee 
Hammond, Jr., were married October 5, 
1991. She is a medical technologist at the 
Veterans Administration Medical Center 
in Richmond. 

Ronald Edward Terry (MHA) and 
Cathryn Lynn Adkins were married Octo- 
ber 12, 1991. He is employed as senior 



consultant by Virginia Professional Under- 
writers, Inc., in Richmond. 



1981 

Craig R. Darcy (D) announces die open- 
ing of his general dentistry practice in 
Laguna Beach, California. Craig and wife 
Lori Ann have one child, Maureen Kim- 
berly. 



1983 

Brian Bullock (P; VCU'90) has joined 
DRxCare, Inc., a subsidiary of Fox Meyer, 
the third largest drug wholesaler in the 
country. He is on the management team 
launching a new franchise program which 
places pharmacists in practice with physi- 
cians. He and wife Cindy have one child, 
Kimberly, and reside in Dallas. 

Susan McCalley Inge Crowgey (N) 
and James Crowgey (M'85) announce the 
birth of their fourth daughter, Sarah Anne, 
on May 31, 1991. Dr. Crowgey is in private 
practice at Randolph Hospital and is board 
certified in anesthesiology. Other daugh- 
ters are Elizabeth, age five, Theresa, three- 
and-a-half, and Caitlin, age two. The fam- 
ily resides in Asheboro, North Carolina. 

Dorie L. Hanes (N) and Billy W. Hanes 
(M'85) announce the birth of their first 
child, Billy Wilson III, on December 3, 
1991. The family resides in Bethesda, 
Maryland. 

R. Christopher Stout (M) of Elkins, 
West Virginia, was inducted as a fellow of 
the American College of Emergency Phy- 
sicians in October 1991. He and wife De- 
borah have two children, Elizabeth, age 
two-and-a-half, and Will, 13 months. 

Randolph Edens "Randy" Thornton 
(M) and wife Reecy announce the birth of 
their first child, Deanna Edens, on No- 
vember 7, 1991. Dr. Thornton is a pedia- 
trician in a group practice in Jacksonville, 
Florida. 

Christy Zaloumis (P) and Brian D. 
Cooney were married November 10, 1990. 
Mrs. Cooney is working for Eli Lilly & Co. 
as a sales representative in the Select Prod- 
ucts Division. The Cooneys reside in 
Oakton. 



1984 

Gerald L. Feldman (M) of Detroit, 
Michigan, has been elected to fellowship 
in the American Academy of Pediatrics. 

Pamela L (M) and Brooke Gwathmey 
(M'85) have relocated their family prac- 
tice to Tappahanock where thev joined 
Jim Ledwith (M'83). The Gwathmeys 
have three children, Matthew, eight-and- 



a-half, Benjamin, four-and-a-half, and Eliza- 
beth, two-and-a-half. 

Sandra N. Harrington (N) and Wil- 
liam G. Harrington (M'78) and their 
six-year-old daughter, Christine, are medi- 
cal missionaries to Kigoma, Tanzania, in 
East Africa. Their next furlough to the 
U.S. will be in August 1993. 



1985 

Richard J. Bass (D) and wife Dr. Patri- 
cia L. Speer (DDS University of Tennes- 
see) announce the birth of their second 
son, Benjamin Jacob, in May 1991. Drs. 
Bass and Speer are both in private practice 
in Portsmouth. Their other son, Philip 
Asher, was born in July 1989. 

Julia Cobbledick Bill (P) and husband 
Brian announce the birth of their first child, 
Michael Macauley, on August 21, 1991. 
The family resides in Williamsburg where 
Mr. Bill is a lawyer for the U.S. Navy. 

Barbara A. Chatfield (M) and husband 
Derek Uchida, MD, announce the birth of 
their daughter, Kimberly Akimi, on July 1, 
1991. Dr. Chatfield completed a fellow- 
ship in pediatric pulmonology at the Uni- 
versity of Colorado and relocated with the 
air force as chief of pediatric pulmonology 
at Keesler Technical Training Center- 
Medical Center in Biloxi, Mississippi. 

Amy Hauck Newman (PhD) and Chris- 
topher John Newman (MS'84) announce 
the birth of Joshua David on December 3, 
1991. The Newmans reside in Silver Spring, 
Maryland, and have a daughter, Kelly 
Elizabeth. 

Millard N. Radford (D)and Bonnie S. 
Daniel were married August 24, 1991. Dr. 
Radford is in private practice in Smith 
Mountain Lake where the couple resides. 

Fehx E. Shepard, Jr. (P), and Karla 
Sue Lake were married June 29, 1991. He 
is in his third year at New York Medical 
College in Valhalla, New York. 



1986 

Drusilla Saunders Powell (M) and hus- 
band Robert announce the birth of their 
first child, Robert Curtis, Jr., on July 14, 
1991. Dr. Powell returned to private prac- 
tice at Chesapeake Pediatrics. 



1987 

Sherri Keatts Giannini (MRA) and 
Robert Giannini (HCM) announce the 
birth of their first child, Cameron Robert 
Barrow, on August 23, 1991. The Gian- 
ninis reside in Danville. 

Anita Powell (MRA) and Mark W. 
McManus. MD, were married November 



20 



9, 1991. The couple resides in Chillicothe, 
Ohio. 

Deborah Elizabeth Zeman (CRS) of 

Cocoa Beach, Florida, received her mas- 
ter's in health care administration from 
Florida Institute of Technology. She is 
vice president of marketing for Pascall 
Medical Corporation, which designs pro- 
tective needles and improved biopsy in- 
struments. 



1988 

Julia Ann Buckland (P) and Bret David 
Borchelt (M'91) were married Septem- 
ber 21, 1991. Mrs. Borchelt is employed 
by Revco Drug Stores, Inc., in Towson, 
Maryland; and Dr. Borchelt is a resident 
physician in surgery at the University of 
Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore. 

Franklin Roosevelt Jim Ewing III (P) 
and Phyllis Smith (VCU'86) were mar- 
ried September 7, 1991. He is a pharma- 
cist at Rite Aid Corporation in Newport 
News where the couple resides. 

Stephen S. Fargis (MHA) of Richmond 
was named assistant vice president of 
Physicians Management Corporation, the 
management company for Doctors Insur- 
ance Reciprocal. He joined the Richmond- 
based firm in 1990 as director of market- 
ing. 

David Greenberg (M) and Tara Pisik 
were married June 8, 1991. She is a phar- 
macist for Eli Lilly & Co., and he is partici- 
pating in a fellowship in neonatology at 
Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center in San 
Antonio, Texas. 

Linda Ellen Hellermann (HCM) and 
Arthur Wilson Underdown were married 
September 7, 1991. She is director of 
Stratford House. The couple resides in 
Danville. 

Pamela L. Miller (N) is assistant ad- 
ministrator/director of nursing at Harbor 
Oaks Hospital, a 79-bed child and adoles- 
cent psychiatric hospital in Fort Walton 
Beach, Florida. She and husband Michael 
Scott Miller (Residency '90) announce 
the birth of their second son, Jeffrey Aaron, 
on August 1, 1991. They reside at Elgin 
AFB, Florida. 

Diana Marie Parisi (N) and Kevin David 
Hunt were married September 14, 1991. 
She was a nurse in the intensive care unit 
at Henrico Doctors' Hospital in Richmond, 
and he is a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy. 
The couple resides in Ocean Springs, 
Mississippi. 

Pamela Jo Short (N) and William Paul 
Sebesky, Jr., were married October 20, 
1990. The couple resides in Manassas. 

1st Lt Everdean Tisdale (N) and Maj. 
Vincent L Collins were married August 
17, 1991. She is employed by MCV Hospi- 



tals and her husband is serving with the 
U.S. Army. 



1989 

Robert Lee Allen (M) and Angela Re- 
nee Reeves were married September 21, 
1991, aboard the U.S.S. Constitution in 
Honolulu. He is an anesthesiologist at 
Emory Hospital in Atlanta, and she is a 
registered nurse anesthetist at Newman 
Hospital in Atlanta. 

Carol Renee Andre (P) and Christo- 
pher Michael Cousins were married Octo- 
ber 5, 1991. She is a pharmacist at Farmco 
Drug in Newport News, and her husband 
is an engineer at Newport News Shipbuild- 
ing. The couple resides in Hampton. 

Marlyn Kay Bess (N) and Michael 
Dean Fabrizio were married December 7, 
1991. She is a nurse in the pediatric inten- 
sive care unit, and he is a medical student 
on the MCV Campus. 

Amy Suzanne Evans (N) and Christo- 
pher Vandership (VCU'90) were married 
April 20, 1991. She is a registered nurse at 
Duke University Medical Center in Dur- 
ham, and he is employed by a radio station 
in Wake Forest, North Carolina. 

Kristin Ann Fillmore (N) and Gary 
Keith Carter were married September 7, 
1991. She is employed by MCV Hospitals, 
and her husband is employed by Richmond 
Homes Management, Inc. 



1990 



Michael James Stephens (P) and Ka- 
trina Hall (VCU'89) were married Sep- 
tember 21, 1991. She is a staff internal 
auditor for James River Corporation, and 
he is a pharmacist at Peoples Drug. The 
couple resides in Richmond. 



1991 



Frank Edward Blondino (P) and Lisa 
Anne Taylor were married in August 1991. 
He is a graduate student in pharmaceutics 
on the MCV Campus and is employed part 
time as a pharmacist at McGuire VA Medi- 
cal Center. She is a graduate student in 
urban and regional planning at VCU. 

Roger Lee Clevinger, Jr. (M), and 
Natalie Jean Grillions were married No- 
vember 9, 1991. He is a resident on the 
MCV Campus. 

Kristine A. Gutleber (OT) and David 
L Blados were married November 16, 1991. 
She is employed by NovaCare, and he is a 
student in education at VCU. 

Susan Elizabeth Shamblen (P) and 
Jonathan Scott Waters were married July 



20, 1991. She is a pharmacist at Sentara 
Hampton General Hospital. They reside 
in Hampton. 

Amanda Rose Steele (N) and Mark 
Lynn Dennis were married May 25, 1991. 
Thev reside in Richmond where she works 
for MCV Hospitals. 



LEST WE FORGET 



1914 



Vivian Vernon Gillum (D), age 99, died 
July 23, 1991. He was a dentist in Manas- 
sas for 58 years and served as component 
president of the Virginia Dental Associa- 
tion. 



1926 



Frances Thompson Brogden (N) of 

Richmond died June 13, 1991. 

W. Tyler Haynes (D) of Richmond died 
October 28, 1991. He had served as presi- 
dent of the Virginia Dental Association 
and was a past president and trustee of 
the Southern Society of Orthodontics. Dr. 
Haynes was clinical professor of orthodon- 
tics emeritus on the MCV Campus. 



1930 



E. Terrill Montgomery (M) of Ponte 
Vedra Beach, Florida, died in February 
1991. 



1934 



Richard Campbell Manson (M), a 

Richmond dermatologist and clinical pro- 
fessor of dermatology at MCV, died No- 
vember 29, 1991. Dr. Manson served as a 
major with the Army's Medical Corps, 45th 
General Hospital in Italy during WWII and 
was awarded the Bronze Star. He was a 
past president of the Richmond Academy 
of Medicine, Virginia Dermatological So- 
ciety, Southeastern Dermatological Soci- 
ety, and the Richmond Chapter of the MCV 
Alumni Association. 

Philip Wood Oden (M), former chief 
of the Spinal Cord Division at McGuire 
Veterans Affairs Medical Center in 
Richmond, died November 15, 1991. 



1936 



Herbert Moore Kaminester (D) of 

Roanoke died May 11, 1991. 



21 



1937 

Stanard Ricketts Gillespie (M) died 
September 6, 1991. In 1948, he founded 
and was the first president of the Oregon 
Academy of Family Practice. In 1964, while 
practicing medicine, he earned his law 
degree from Lewis and Clark College in 
Portland, Oregon. 



1938 

Raymond Scrivener Blackman (M), a 

retired staff physician at Blue Ridge Hos- 
pital, died December 14, 1991. He was a 
clinical assistant professor of medicine at 
the University of Virginia. 



1940 

Benjamin Rosenberg (M) of Boynton 
Beach, Florida, died June 10, 1991. 



1943 

Paul Fitzgerald, Jr. (D), of Raleigh, 
North Carolina, died in April 1991. 



1947 

John Royal Carson (D) of Rocky Mount, 
North Carolina, died November 16, 1991. 

Florine Logue (PT) of Columbia, Mis- 
souri, died October 8, 1991. 

Rama A. Schramm (RT) died Febru- 
ary 7, 1991. 



1948 

William H. Whitmore, Jr. (M), of Sal- 
isbury, Maryland, died September 1, 1991. 



1950 



David C. Forrest (M) of Richmond 
died November 19, 1991. Dr. Forrest was 
active in the founding of the obstetrics- 
gynecology department at St. Mary's Hos- 
pital and was a professor on the MCV 
Campus. 

Walker Pettyjohn Sydnor (D) of Lyn- 
chburg died June 13, 1991. Dr. Sydnor 
was a past president of the Lynchburg 
Dental Society and the Piedmont Dental 
Society. He had served as a member of 
the Executive Council of the Virginia Dental 
Association. 



1954 

Clarence H. Collins (D) of Salem died 
July 2, 1991. 



1956 

Clayton Roland Robinson (D) of Vir- 
ginia Beach died October 18, 1991. Dr. 
Robinson was a past president of the Tide- 
water Dental Association. 



1967 

Maurice Novick (M), a Tampa, Flor- 
ida, plastic surgeon, died December 5, 1991. 



1970 

L. Daniel Crooks, Jr. (M), a Richmond 
gynecologist and obstetrician, died August 
29, 1991. He was chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Gynecology at Johnston-Willis 
Hospital from 1984 until 1988 and had been 
a clinical instructor on the MCV Campus. 



1944 

Charles G. Thompson (P; M'49) of 

Marion died November 17, 1991. 



1953 



Dominic A. Brancazio (M) of Weirton, 
West Virginia, died December 2, 1991. 



What's New with You? 

The Scarab welcomes updates on marriages, family additions, job changes, relocations, promotions— whatever you think is newsworthy. Help 
us keep track of you by filling out this form and returning it. Recent newspaper clippings and photographs also are appreciated. Please send 
updated information to MCV Alumni Association of VCU, Box 156, Richmond, VA 23298-0156. 



Name 
Class _ 



Degree 



Spouse's full name 
Class 



Degree 



Children . 



(Indicate if currently attending MCV/VCU.) 



Address 



NEWS ITEMS . 



22 



Look for your school's 
schedule of events . . . 



SCHOOL OF 



IKS 



IIS 



SCHOOL OF 

i yrn tii nn 
j lUlU H uu 



Friday. May 1. 1992 

8 am-5 pm Registration— Marriott 

1 pm-4 pm Thirty-fourth Annual Scientific Assembly, Session I — "Mapping 

the Human Genome," Cynthia C. Morton, PhD; the 1992 Basic Health Sci- 
ences Outstanding Alumna; Session II — "A Novel Vitamin Recycling Dis- 
order: From the Laboratory to the Patient," Barry Wolf, MD, PhD; Session 
III— "Genetic and Environmental Factors in Human Development," Lindon 
J. Eaves, PhD, DSc; Session IV— "Studies of Globin Gene Regulation Us- 
ing a Transgenic Mouse Model," Joyce A. Lloyd, PhD; Session V — 
"Aneuploidy Levels in Human Sperm," Colleen Jackson-Cook, PhD; Ses- 
sion VI — "Genetic Epidemiology of Depression and Anxiety," Kenneth S. 
Kendler, MD— Marriott 

2 pm-5 pm MCVAA Hospitality Suite— Marriott 

6 pm-7 pm MCVAA Welcome Reception— Marriott 



Friday, May 1, 1992 

8am-5pm Registration — Marriott 

1 pm-4 pm Thirty-fourth Annual Scientific Assembly, Session I — "Mapping 

the Human Genome," Cynthia C Morton, PhD; the 1992 Basic Health 
Sciences Outstanding Alumna; Session II — "A Novel Vitamin Recycling 
Disorder: From the Laboratory to the Patient," Barry Wolf, MD, PhD; 
Session III— "Genetic and Environmental Factors in Human Develop- 
ment," Lindon J Eaves, PhD, DSc; Session IV— "Studies of Globin Gene 
Regulation Using a Transgenic Mouse Model," Joyce A. Lloyd, PhD; 
Session V— "Aneuploidy Levels in Human Sperm," Colleen Jackson-Cook, 
PhD; Session VI — "Genetic Epidemiology of Depression and Anxiety," 
Kenneth S. Kendler, MD— Marriott 

2 pm-5 pm MCVAA Hospitality Suite— Marriott 

6 pm-7 pm MCVAA Welcome Reception— Marriott 

7 pm-9 pm Basic Health Sciences Division Dinner — Marriott 



Attention Radiation Sciences Alumni! Look for details including 
a registration form for reunion activities in separate mailings. 
Please send inquires and alumni updates to Reunion Committee, 
MCV Box 495, Richmond, VA 232980495 



Saturday, May 2, 1992 

7:45am-9:30 am Shuttles run every 15 minutes to MCV Campus — Depart 

from Marriott. 
8 am-5 pm Registration — Marriott 

8:30 am Continental Breakfast — Richmond Academy of Medicine 
9:30 am-11:30 am Continuing Education Program — "The Future: Preventing 

Disease and Disability," Carolyn Baum, Director of the Occupational 

Therapy Program, Washington University School of Medicine — Richmond 

Academy of Medicine 
10 am-3 pm Shuttles to Willow Lawn Shopping Center run on the hour — 

Depart from and return to Marriott. 

10 am-2 pm Tour of Tuckahoe Plantation and Lunch — Depart from and 
return to Marriott. 

11 am-12 noon Shuttles run continuously from MCV Campus to Larrick 
Center to Marriott 

12 noon Luncheon for Allied Health Professions Alumni — Valentine 
Museum 

12 noon-2 pm MCVAA Annual Meeting and Luncheon — MCV Campus — 

Larrick Center 
2 pm-5 pm Tours of MCV Hospitals and MCV Campus 
2 pm-5:30 pm Shuttles run to Marriott from MCV Campus every 

one-half hour. 
6 pm-7 pm MCVAA Alumni Reception— Marriott 
6 pm-8 pm Occupational Therapy Alumni — Wine and Cheese Reception 

Celebrating 50 years of Occupational Therapy at MCV — Marriott 
6 pm-8 pm Physical Therapy Alumni Reception/Cash Bar— Honoring 

Retiring Professor Marianne McDonald — Marriott 



Saturday, May 2, 1992 

7:45 am-9:30 am Shuttles run every 15 minutes to MCV Campus— Depart 

from Marriott. 
8am-5pm Registration— Marriott 
10 am-3 pm Shuttles to Willow Lawn Shopping Center run on the hour — 

Depart from and return to Marriott. 

10 am-2 pm Tour of Tuckahoe Plantation and Lunch — Depart from and 
return to Marriott. 

11 am-12 noon Shuttles run continuously from MCV Campus to Larrick 
Center to Marriott. 

12 noon-2 pm MCVAA Annual Meeting and Luncheon— MCV Campus— 
Larrick Center 

2 pm-5 pm Tours of MCV Hospitals and MCV Campus 

2 pm-5:30 pm Shuttles run to Marriott from MCV Campus every 

one-half hour. 
6 pm-7 pm MCVAA Alumni Reception — Marriott 



Sunday, May 3, 1992 

8:45 am Buses to Monumental Church — Depart from Marriott. 

9 am Memorial Service honoring deceased alumni of Classes of 1942 and 

prior — Monumental Church 
9:30 am Buses to Marriott— Depart from Monumental Church. 
10:30 am-12 noon All Alumni Brunch honoring Classes of 1942 and prior 

and the recipients of the 1992 Outstanding Alumnus and Hodges-Kay 

Service Awards — Marriott 



Sunday, May 3, 1992 

8:45 am Buses to Monumental Church— Depart from Marriott. 

9 am Memorial Service honoring deceased alumni of Classes of 1942 and 

prior — Monumental Church 
9:30 am Buses to Marriott — Depart from Monumental Church. 
10:30 am-12 noon All Alumni Brunch honoring Classes of 1942 and prior 

and the recipients of the 1992 Outstanding Alumnus and Hodges-Kay 

Service Awards — Marriott 



SCHOOL OF 



SCHOOL OF 



mis 



Friday, May 1. 1992 

8 am-5 pm Registration— Marriott 

1 pm-4 pm Thirty-fourth Annual Scientific Assembly, Session I— "Mapping 

the Human Genome," Cynthia C. Morton, PhD; the 1992 Basic Health 
Sciences Outstanding Alumna; Session II — "A Novel Vitamin Recycling 
Disorder: From the Laboratory to the Patient," Barry Wolf, MD, PhD; 
Session III— "Genetic and Environmental Factors in Human Develop- 
ment," Lindon J. Eaves, PhD, DSc; Session IV — "Studies of Globin Gene 
Regulation Using a Transgenic Mouse Model," Joyce A. Lloyd, PhD; 
Session V — "Aneuploidy Levels in Human Sperm," Colleen Jackson- 
Cook, PhD; Session VI— "Genetic Epidemiology of Depression and 
Anxiety," Kenneth S. Kendler, MD— Marriott 

2 pm-5 pm MCVAA Hospitality Suite— Marriott 

6 pm-7 pm MCVAA Welcome Reception— Marriott 

7 pm-9 pm Medicine Division Dinner — Presentation of Awards — Marriott 

9 pm Medicine Division Class Suites — Marriott 
9:30 pm Medicine Division Class Suites — Marriott 



Friday, May 1, 1992 

8am-5pm Registration — Marriott 

1 pm-4 pm Thirty-fourth Annual Scientific Assembly, Session I — "Mapping 

the Human Genome," Cynthia C. Morton, PhD; the 1992 Basic Health 
Sciences Outstanding Alumna; Session II— "A Novel Vitamin Recycling 
Disorder: From the Laboratory to the Patient," Barry Wolf, MD, PhD; 
Session III— "Genetic and Environmental Factors in Human Develop- 
ment," Lindon J. Eaves, PhD, DSc; Session IV — "Studies of Globin Gene 
Regulation Using a Transgenic Mouse Model," Joyce A. Lloyd, PhD; 
Session V— "Aneuploidy Levels in Human Sperm," Colleen Jackson- 
Cook, PhD; Session VI— "Genetic Epidemiology of Depression and 
Anxiety," Kenneth S. Kendler, MD— Marriott 

2 pm-5 pm MCVAA Hospitality Suite— Marriott 

6 pm-7 pm MCVAA Welcome Reception— Marriott 



Saturday, May 2, 1 992 

7:45 am-9:30 am Shuttles run every 15 minutes to MCV Campus — Depart 

from Marriott. 
8am-5pm Registration — Marriott 
8 am Continental Breakfast — Foyer of Baruch Auditorium, Egyptian 

Building 
8:30 am-11:30 am Continuing Education Program, Session I— "Advances in 

Pediatrics," Session II— "Coronary Artery Disease: Management 

Options," Session III— "Cardiac Surgery in the '90s"— Baruch Auditorium, 

Egyptian Building 
10 am-3 pm Shuttles to Willow Lawn Shopping Center run on the hour — 

Depart from and return to Marriott. 

10 am-2 pm Tour of Tuckahoe Plantation and Lunch — Depart from and 
return to Marriott. 

11 am-12 noon Shuttles run continuously from MCV Campus to Larrick 
Center to Marriott. 

12 noon-2 pm MCVAA Annual Meeting and Luncheon— MCV Campus — 
Larrick Center 

2 pm-5 pm Tours of MCV Hospitals and MCV Campus 
2 pm-5:30 pm Shuttles run to Marriott from MCV Campus every 
one-half hour. 

6 pm-7 pm MCVAA Alumni Reception— Marriott 

7 pm-12 midnight Individual Reunion Class dinners and parties— Class 

Photograph — Information and reservations should be made through 
class letters. 



Saturday, May 2, 1992 

7:45 am-9:30 am Shuttles run every 15 minutes to MCV Campus — Depart 

from Marriott. 
8am-5pm Registration— Marriott 

8:30 am Continental Breakfast — Richmond Academy of Medicine 
9:30 am-11:00 am Nursing Lectureship — "Keeping Up With the Times: 

Issues in Nursing Practice and Education," Polly Bednash, Executive 

Director, American Association of Colleges of Nursing — Richmond 

Academy of Medicine 
10 am-3 pm Shuttles to Willow Lawn Shopping Center run on the hour — 

Depart from and return to Marriott. 

10 am-2 pm Tour of Tuckahoe Plantation and Lunch — Depart from and 
return to Marriott 

11 am Nursing Division Annual Meeting— Richmond Academy of 
Medicine 

11 am-12 noon Shuttles run continuously from MCV Campus to Larrick 
Center to Marriott. 

12 noon-2 pm MCVAA Annual Meeting and Luncheon— MCV Campus— 
Larrick Center 

2 pm-5 pm Tours of MCV Hospitals and MCV Campus 
2 pm-5:30 pm Shuttles run to Marriott from MCV Campus every 
one-half hour. 

6 pm-7 pm MCVAA Alumni Reception— Individual reunion class 

photographs— Marriott 

7 pm-9 pm Nursing Division Dinner — Presentation of Awards — Marriott 



Sunday, May 3, 1992 

8:45 am Buses to Monumental Church — Depart from Marriott. 

9 am Memorial Service honoring deceased alumni of Classes of 1942 and 

prior— Monumental Church 
9:30 am Buses to Marriott— Depart from Monumental Church. 
10:30 am-12 noon All Alumni Brunch honoring Classes of 1942 and prior 

and the recipients of the 1992 Outstanding Alumnus and Hodges-Kay 

Service Awards— Marriott 



Sunday, May 3, 1992 

8:45 am Buses to Monumental Church— Depart from Marriott. 

9 am Memorial Service honoring deceased alumni of Classes of 1942 and 

prior — Monumental Church 
9:30 am Buses to Marriott— Depart from Monumental Church. 
10:30 am-12 noon All Alumni Brunch honoring Classes of 1942 and prior 

and the recipients of the 1992 Outstanding Alumnus and Hodges-Kay 

Service Awards — Marriott 



SCHOOL OF 

■rati 



Friday. May 1, 1992 

8 am-5 pm Registration— Marriott 

1 pin 4 pin Thirty-fourth Annual Scientific Assembly, Session I — "Mapping 

the Human Genome," Cynthia C. Morton, PhD; the 1992 Basic Health 
Sciences Outstanding Alumna; Session II — "A Novel Vitamin Recycling 
Disorder: From the Laboratory to the Patient," Barry Wolf, MD, PhD; 
Session III — "Genetic and Environmental Factors in Human Develop- 
ment," Lindon J. Eaves, PhD, DSc; Session IV — "Studies of Globin Gene 
Regulation Using a Transgenic Mouse Model," Joyce A. Lloyd, PhD; 
Session V — "Aneuploidy Levels in Human Sperm," Colleen Jackson- 
Cook, PhD; Session VI — "Genetic Epidemiology of Depression and 
Anxiety," Kenneth S Kendler, MD— Marriott 

2 pm-5 pm MCVAA Hospitality Suite— Marriott 

6 pm-7 pm MCVAA Welcome Reception— Marriott 



Saturday, May 2, 1 992 

7:45 am 9:30 am Shuttles run every 15 minutes to MCV Campus— Depart 

from Marriott. 
8 am-5 pm Registration — Marriott 

8 am Continental Breakfast — Smith Building 

8:30-11:30 am Continuing Education Program, "The Pharmacist's Role in 
the Treatment of Sports Related Injuries" — Smith Building 

10 am- 3 pm Shuttles to Willow Lawn Shopping Center run on the hour — 
Depart from and return to Marriott. 

10 am-3 pm Tour of Tuckahoe Plantation and Lunch — Depart from and 
return to Marriott. 

11 am-12 noon Shuttles run continuously from MCV Campus to Larrick 
Center to Marriott. 

12 noon-2 pm MCVAA Annual Meeting and Luncheon — MCV Campus — 
Larrick Center 

2 pm-5 pm Tours of MCV Hospitals and MCV Campus 

2 pm-5:30 pm Shuttles run to Marriott from MCV Campus every 

one-half hour. 
6 pm-7 pm MCVAA Alumni Reception — Individual reunion class 

photographs — Marriott 
7-9 pm Pharmacy Division Dinner — Presentation of Awards — Marriott 

9 pm Pharmacy Reunion Class Suites — Marriott 



Sunday, May 3, 1992 

8:45 am Buses to Monumental Church — Depart from Marriott. 

9 am Memorial Service honoring deceased alumni of Classes of 1942 and 

prior — Monumental Church 
9:30 am Buses to Marriott— Depart from Monumental Church. 
10:30 am-12 noon All Alumni Brunch honoring Classes of 1942 and prior 

and the recipients of the 1992 Outstanding Alumnus and Hodges-Kay 

Service Awards — Marriott 



Complete this form and make your check payable to 

MCV Alumni Association. 
Mail to 

MCV Alumni Association of VCU 

MCV Box 156 

Richmond, VA 23298-0156. 

Indicate the number attending and the total cost. 



Friday, May 1, 1992 

01 MCV Alumni Association Hospitality Suite 

02 Scientific Assembly 

03 Welcome Reception 

04 Basic Health Sciences Division Dinner 

05 Medical Division Dinner 

06 Medicine Class of Suite 

Saturday, May 2, 1992 

20 Allied Health Alumni Continental Breakfast 

21 Medicine Alumni Continental Breakfast 

22 Nursing Alumni Continental Breakfast 

23 Pharmacy Alumni Continental Breakfast 

24 Tour of Tuckahoe Plantation 

25 Allied Health Continuing Education Program 

26 Medicine Continuing Education Program 

27 Nursing Lectureship 

28 Pharmacy Continuing Education Program 

29 MCV Alumni Association Lunch 

30 Allied Health Lunch 

31 MCV Alumni Association Hospitality Suite 

32 MCV Alumni Association Reception 

33 Nursing Division Dinner 

34 Occupational Therapy Wine and Cheese 

35 Pharmacy Division Dinner 

36 Physical Therapy Reception (cash bar) 

37 Pharmacy Class of Suite 

Sunday, May 3, 1992 

40 Memorial Services 

41 Alumni Brunch honoring 50-year graduates 

41 Alumni Brunch for members of Class of 1942 and prior 



Class Photographs 

50 Nursing Class of 

51 Pharmacy Class of 

52 Medicine Class of 



Processing fee for non-dues paying members 
Processing fee for dues paying members 



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Check here if you would like to become a member of the MCV Alumni 

Association. (Please make out a separate check in the amount of S30 for dues 
and include with the registration form.) 



SCARAB 



JAMES T. ASHWELL (D! 






One incident I shall 
always remember 
occurred on De- 
cember 7, 1941. 
— -■* k&i' ^ w0 classmates 

i , s£m and I attended a 

jg^K l^fch mau nee at Lowe's 

Theater and were 
I fl I I returning home 
^^^ ^™ ^^^ down Broad Street 
to hear people yelling, "The Japs have 
bombed Pearl Harbor!" Our immediate 
thought was, would we be allowed to 
graduate before being ordered to active 
duty as we were holding reserve com- 
missions. We did graduate in June 1942, 
and most of us went on active duty im- 
mediately in the navy as reserves. After 
two years I elected to become a career 
officer in the regular navy and served 31 
years, retiring in September 1973 as a 
captain. December 7, 1941, changed my 
whole life! 



RAYMOND S. BROWN (M) 

* An embarrassing 
incident happened 
one day while work- 
ing in the labora- 
tory for Mr. Pitts 
£. when I was prepar- 

. VHk ing a solution of so- 
li «H| diuni hydroxide to 
- y vB I be used the next 
■ v « ™^* day in class. The 
Exothermic reaction heated the bottle 
up which caused it to break while I was 
shaking it to dissolve it. The solution 
spilled all over my trousers; on the way 
home I looked as though I had wet my 
pants. I met some of my Gloucester 
friends on my way home that day! I did 
the preparation over with more care, and 
Mr. Pitts never knew of the accident or 
the loss of his precious chemicals. The 
pants dissolved when they were cleaned. 




REMINISCENCES 



Here are a 

few excerpts from a new 

publication on the 

reminiscences of the 

Classes of 1942. 

All class members will 

receive a copy at reunion. 

It will also be available 

from the Alumni Association; 

for a copy, please call the 

MCV Alumni Office 

at (804) 786-0434. 




ORMOND L. HAYNES (M) 

In the late 1930s 
most medical stu- 
dents lived in room- 
ing houses and ate 
their meals at 
boarding houses in 
the area. An inci- 
dent occurred in 
my sophomore 
year at MCV that 
is still very vivid in my memory. I ate all 
of my meals at Mrs. Payton's boarding 
house on East Marshall Street; board for 
a month was eighteen dollars; room rent 
at that time was about ten dollars a month. 
We were on autopsy call at this par- 
ticular time, and one morning we had to 
attend four posts. Three of the four were 
liver abscesses. And, that day at noon, 
dear Mrs. Payton served liver! I wasn't 
sure I could handle it, but I did. When- 
ever I am eating out and see liver and on- 
ions on the menu, this experience comes 
back to me! 



JAMES 0. HUBBARD (P] 






On a winter's day 
along about 1940, 
with 18-20 inches 
of snow blanketing 
Richmond, I 
trudged the 16 
blocks from my 
boarding house to 
the pharmacy lab 
to complete an 
assay with aspirin (Munex-Worth @ $.11/ 
100 vs. Bayer @ about $.50/100). I was 
wearing a heavy, long-sleeved white 
sweater and encountered Dean Rudd in 
the hallway; the conversation went like 
this: 

"Good morning Hubbard, where is 
your suit coat?" 

"Good morning dean, this is much 
warmer, sir." 

"Must I remind you, you are in a pro- 
fessional institution now, and you will 
dress appropriately?" 
"Yes sir, dean!" 

The Munez-Worth checked out, ac- 
cording to my analysis, to be higher in 
aspirin content than the Bayer. 



26 



SCARAB 




RUTH MOSBY COX (P) 

My most vivid 
memory of my 
years at MCV is Dr. 
Hughes' compara- 
tive anatomy class. 
We had to dissect 
a cat and learn its 
anatomy along with 
the comparable 
part in man. The 
first lab was very traumatic! That cold, 
stiff tomcat, reeking of formaldehyde, 
made me shiver. I just could not touch 
him. For two lab periods I sat staring at 
that creature, unable to put my hands on 
him. Finally, I realized if I wanted to be 
a pharmacist I had to grit my teeth, pick 
up the scalpel, and get to work. To this 
day, I do not like cats! 

Of course, I remember Dean Rudd 
with great affection. As I was the only 
girl in the class he seemed to take a 
fatherly interest in me. He would call 
me to the office to inquire about my 
school work and social life so that by 
graduation, I felt like we were related. 
My husband, William F. Cox (P'42), and 
I were married the day after graduation 
in St. John's Episcopal Church on Church 
Hill while our families were in town for 
graduation. I invited Dean Rudd to the 
wedding, and several days before the 
event he called me to his office. He said 
he had investigated Bill Cox and thought 
it was okay for me to marry him. We 
were honored he attended both the 
wedding and the luncheon at the John 
Marshall Hotel. 



MARION HART HOWARD (N) 

My most interest- 
ing experience as 
a nurse was to serve 
with the 45th Gen- 
eral Hospital dur- 
ing WWII. Such an 
education for a 
country girl just 
graduated from 
MCV! Not only did 
I have some interesting nursing experi- 
ences, but I got to travel to Africa and 
Italy. 





WILLIAM F. COX (M) 

Some years ago a 
lady patient came 
to me complaining 
of recent ringing in 
her ears. She said 
it was driving her 
up the wall. After 
my exam I told her 
my findings were 
normal, that this 
condition was called tinnitus and was 
often associated with early nerve deaf- 
ness, that there was no satisfactory medi- 
cation for it, and most people adjusted to 
it. I then told her I had had it for about 
five years. She asked how I stood it, and 
I pointed out that with time I had noticed 
it less and less 'til at present I noticed it 
only when discussing it or in bed when 
all was quiet. I said, "In fact, there are 
times when I get bored so I listen to it for 
entertainment!" She flushed, looked me 
straight in the eye and said, "You go to 
hell!" She turned out to be a staunch and 
enjoyable patient for many years. 



CYRIL R. MIRMELSTEIN (0) 

The most signifi- 
cant and propitious 
event has to be as 
a result of my stay- 
ing at MCV after 
graduation, where 
I interned and in- 
structed at the 
dental school. As 
luck would have it, 
Dr. Sumpter Arnim's laboratory assis- 
tant developed a toothache. He sent her 
to the clinic to see me, and next year 
Evelyn and I will celebrate our 50th 
wedding anniversary! 




MARY CAHOON GARB Y (III) 

An amusing incident from student nurse 
days at MCV-we were not allowed to 
wear make up, hair had to be above the 
shoulder in a net, and so forth. Dean E. 
Louise Grant kept a sharp eye for any- 
one who did not obey these rules and 
regulations. She checked me several 
times for rouge and lipstick but was not 
convinced my pink cheeks and red lips 
were due to good health and inheritance. 
One day I was called to her office for a 
personal inspection with Kleenex, after 
which she accepted the fact that my color 
was indeed natural. What a difference 
50 years makes! Could this possibly 
happen in nursing school today? 



LEONARD 0. POLICOFF (M) 

Dr. "Ike" Bigger, then chief of surgery, 
was quizzing our class about the control 
of pain in trauma patients. A student, 
who shall remain nameless, suggested 
giving four grains of morphine. Dr. Bigger 
made no comment. A bit later, the stu- 
dent raised his hand and said, "I meant 
one quarter of a grain." Dr. Bigger smiled 
frostily and said, 'Too late, Mr. X., your 
patient has been dead for ten minutes!" 



27 



SCARAB 



Barker 

Continued from page 11. 



Health Professions will host the third 
annual job fair for students seeking 
employment in health care fields. Rep- 
resentatives of employers from several 
states visit the campus to talk with stu- 
dents about job opportunities. 

Students, faculty, and alumni. These 
three are woven into the fabric which 
make the School of Allied Health Profes- 
sions. Each is essential to what it is we 
are doing to prepare future generations 
of health care professionals. The strength 
of these groups individually is awesome; 
combined they have the power to make 
the School of Allied Health Professions 
reach even greater heights. ■ 



Bradley 

Continued from page 12. 



University and was the recipient of Vir- 
ginia Commonwealth University's Riese- 
Melton Award for contributions to mul- 
ticultural harmony. Dr. Alex Clarke (as- 
sociate professor of biomedical engineer- 
ing) and Dr. Martin Lenhardt (professor 
of otolaryngology) have invented a su- 
personic bone-conduction hearing device 
that may enable nerve-deaf subjects to 
hear. Dr. Lindon Eaves (distinguished 
professor of human genetics) has been 
selected to give the keynote address for 
a series of workshops at the Center of 
Theology and Natural Sciences at 
Berkeley, California. The workshops will 
address ethical dilemmas arising from 
application of molecular genetics to 
humans. Dr. Albert Munson (professor 
of pharmacology and toxicology) was 
the 1991 recipient of VCU's Outstanding 
Faculty Award for excellence in teach- 
ing, research, and service. Dr. Philip 
Hylemon was named Outstanding VCU 
Faculty in research, and Dr. Judith Brown 
(professor of human genetics) was named 
Outstanding VCU Faculty in service. 



The School of Basic Health Sciences 
has lost a number of dedicated faculty 
and staff to retirement. These include 
Ms. Betty Whitlock (anatomy and physi- 
ology), Mr. James Al Johnson (anatomy), 
Dr. Robert Bowe (associate professor of 
pharmacology and toxicology) , Dr. Stan 
Higgins, professor of biochemistry and 
biophysics), Dr. Ken Rogers (professor 
of biochemistry and biophysics), Dr. Ives 
Townsend (associate professor of human 
genetics), and Dr. William Keefe (asso- 
ciate professor of biostatistics) . These 
faculty and staff made special contribu- 
tions to the School of Basic Health Sci- 
ences and to VCU and will be missed. 

The School of Basic Health Sciences 
takes great pride in the quality of its 
faculty as teachers. Dr. Linda Costanzo 
(associate professor of physiology) was 
honored by the School of Medicine's 
Dean's Award for her outstanding con- 
tributions to medical education. Dr. John 
Povlishock (professor of anatomy) and 
Dr. Glenn Van Tuyle (associate profes- 
sor of biochemistry and molecular bio- 
physics) were cited by the School of 
Medicine for their outstanding teaching. 
The faculty of the school of Basic Health 
Sciences continues to take a lead in inno- 
vative approaches to instruction. Many 
faculty are using computer-driven pro- 
jection equipment rather than traditional 
projection slides. The Independent Study 
and Learning Environment (ISLE) is now 
networked to the VAX in Academic 
Computing East. Dr. Kimber White, Jr., 
(associate professor of biostatistics) is 
succeeding Dr. William Keefe as direc- 
tor of our computer literacy course. The 
faculty offers courses for undergraduate 
students on the Academic Campus as 
well as graduate courses and health pro- 
fessions instruction on the MCV Cam- 
pus. Dr. Joe Formica, (microbiology 
and immunology) has developed a bio- 
technology course, and faculty in bio- 
chemistry and molecular biophysics of- 
fers a two-semester undergraduate bio- 
chemistry course on the Academic 
Campus. 

The faculty and the School of Basic 
Health Sciences are woven into the fab- 
ric of science education in the Richmond 
region. The faculty of the Department of 
physiology taught an evening course off 
campus, primarily for secondary school 
science teachers. The faculty is prepar- 
ing for another Saturday morning series 
in conjunction with the Richmond Mathe- 



matics and Science Center. For 20 years, 
the faculty has offered science educa- 
tional enhancements through the 
Questers program for middle school and 
high school students. The School of 
Basic Health Sciences has also worked 
with Dr. Elizabeth Blatt (interim direc- 
tor of the Science Museum of Virginia) 
to develop a state wide bio express pro- 
gram for high school students and teach- 
ers. The Science Museum is seeking 
support for this project from the Hughes 
Foundation. Ms. Esther Branch (pro- 
gram specialist, dean's office) coordinated 
a display at Midlothian High School as 
part of its careers day. The faculty pres- 
ents numerous programs to area elemen- 
tary and secondary schools. 

The faculty of The School of Basic 
Health Sciences continues to compete 
successfully at the national level. Fed- 
eral research support for VCU exceeds 
that of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and 
State University, and research support 
for academic medical research on the 
MCV Campus exceeds that of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia medical center. Nev- 
ertheless, budget cuts and loss of staff 
and faculty positions have a serious and 
lasting effect on the school's programs. 
As tuition and fees rise, we will be able 
to provide opportunities for fewer gradu- 
ate students. This comes at a time when 
the demand for biomedical scientists is 
climbing to an all-time high. The School 
of Basic Health Sciences and higher 
education in general are facing great 
challenges. With the help of our alumni, 
friends, staff, students, and faculty, we 
expect to meet these challenges and 
continue to serve Virginia and the nation 
for the common good. ■ 



28 





COLLECTOR'S HEMS 




ORDER FORM 

Chairs with seal 

The supplier will ship directly to you for the price indi- 
cated, plus applicable freight and tax. Because the 
Alumni Office has been relocated, it can no longer 
serve as the shipping address for chairs for subse- 
quent pickup by purchasers 
Black lacquer captain's chair, $210 including 

UPS shipping 
Black lacquer captain's chair with cherry arms, 

$210 including UPS shipping 
Black lacquer Boston rocker, $195 plus C.O.D. 

freight 
Black lacquer side chair, $195 plus C.O.D. 

freight 
Child's rocker, $115 including UPS shipping 

Bright finished pewter with MCV 
seal engraved. 

Free of lead hazard and safe for eating and drinking 
purposes. All orders add $2 50 per cup for postage 
and handling. 

Baby cup, 4oz., $22 NEW 

Virginia bowl, small, $32 NEW (not shown) 

Jefferson cup, 8 oz., $14 

Virginia cup, 12 oz. , $22 (not shown) 

Virginia cup, 8 oz., $18 

Virginia cup, 2 oz., $12.50 (not shown) 

Virginia tankard, 14 oz., $32 (not shown) 

Pen/pencil holder, $15 NEW (not shown) 

Change tray, $15 NEW (not shown) 

MCV Watches 

Mens $207.50 

Womens $207.50 

Price includes shipping 

plus applicable lax 

Pictures price includes postage 

Alumni House (color), $15 plus applicable tax 

MCV Campus (black and white), $4.50 plus 

applicable tax 

Books price includes postage 

As I Remember, by Dr. W. T. Sanger, $10 plus 

applicable tax 

Payment must accompany all orders 

Add an additional 4.5 percent sales tax on all items 

delivered in Virginia. 
All prices subject to change without notice. 
Allow 10-12 weeks for chair shipments. 
Allow three weeks for pewter shipments. 

Send orders to 

MCV Alumni Association of VCU 
MCV Box 156 
Richmond, VA 23298-0156 



NAME (PLEASE PRINT) 



ADDRESS 



STATE ZIP 



SHIPPING ADDRESS 



TELEPHONE 

All items except the chairs can be 
picked up from the 

MCV Alumni Association Office 

MCV West Hospital. 16th Floor, West Wing 

12th and East Broad Streets, Richmond, Virginia, 



MCV Alumni Association of VCU 

Scarab 

Box 156 

Richmond, VA 23298^)156 



Nonprofit Organization 
U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Permit No. 761 

Richmond, Virginia 



1991-1992 Calendar 


Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 


of Virginia Commonwealth University 


April 


May 


June 


3-5 DENTAL HOMECOMING 


13 MCVALUMNI 


840 ALLIED HEALTH 


Marriott Hotel 


ASSOCIATION OF VCU 


PROFESSIONS DIVISION 


Richmond, VA 


REUNION 


Virginia Council on Social 




Marriott Hotel 


Welfare Meeting Gerontology 


5-10 BASIC HEALTH 


Richmond, VA 


Alumni 


SCIENCES DIVISION 






Federation of American 


16 COMMENCEMENT 


14-18 ALLIED HEALTH 


Societies for Experimental 




PROFESSIONS DIVISION 


Biology 


27 BASIC HEALTH 


Ameerican Physical Therapy 


Anaheim, CA 


SCIENCES DIVISION 


Association Meeting 




American Society for 


Denver, CO 


24-26 ALLIED HEALTH 


Microbiology 




1 PROFESSIONS DIVISION 


Alumni Reception 




Virginia Cou cil on Social 


New Orleans, LA 




j Welfare Meeting Gerontology 






i Alumni 






28 MEDICAL DIVISION 






' Student Career Night 






j Richmond, VA 






DENTAL HOMECOMING 


j April 3 - 5, 1992 


MCV ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF VCU 


REUNION | 


May 1 - 3, 1992 


For information about schec 


uled events, please call MCV Alumni Office at (804 


) 786-0434 or (804) 225-4595.